Adkins Arboretum Offers Sunday Programs for Families

Playing outdoors, building stick forts, chasing frogs and digging in the dirt aren’t just fun, they actually help children develop emotionally and intellectually. Rachel Carson, author of A Sense of Wonder, wrote that “If a child is to keep alive his inborn sense of wonder, he needs the companionship of at least one adult who can share it, rediscovering with him the joy, excitement and mystery of the world we live in.” This spring and summer, Adkins Arboretum invites the whole family to spend fun-filled afternoons with environmental educator Coreen Weilminster, learning about birds, wetlands and making connections to the outdoors while discovering their own sense of wonder and their place in the natural world.

For more information or to register, call 410-634-2847, ext. 0

The Arboretum is an Oasis
Sunday, April 26, 11 a.m.–2 p.m.
Fee: $5 per person members, $7 per person general public
Migratory birds use rich and diverse parcels of land as stopovers during their long and difficult migrations. Adkins Arboretum is an oasis for them. Using binoculars, field guides, and a site map, become an avian detective to determine which birds are adapted for life at the Arboretum, and learn what their presence reveals about biodiversity and environmental health. We can be stewards of biodiversity by doing some simple things for birds in our neighborhoods—thus making more oases for our migratory friends. Pack a lunch and dress for both indoor and outdoor activities.

Wetlands are Wonderlands
Sunday, May 31, 11 a.m.–2 p.m.
Fee: $5 per person members, $7 per person general public
After a spring thaw, the Arboretum’s wetland will be teeming with critters. Participants will use nets and field microscopes to investigate what is stirring in the water. We’ll also explore why wetlands are so important to our land and waterways. Through simulation games and scientific investigation, we’ll look into what makes wetlands WONDERFUL! Pack a lunch and dress for both indoor and outdoor activities.

A Night Under the Stars
Saturday, June 27, 6 p.m.
Fee: $5 per person members, $7 per person general public
Wake up to a Sense of Wonder! Spend the night at the Arboretum and participate in the Great American Campout! Sit around a campfire to roast hotdogs and marshmallows, learn about the ecology of the night, and marvel in the beauty of the night sky with a bit of stargazing. Bring your own tent and sleeping bags, a flashlight, and toiletries…and don’t forget your sense of wonder!
Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. Through its Campaign to Build a Green Legacy, the Arboretum will build a new LEED-certified Arboretum Center and entranceway to broaden educational offerings and research initiatives promoting best practices in conservation and land stewardship. For additional information about Arboretum programs, visit www.adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

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Adkins Arboretum Offers Sunday Programs For Families

Playing outdoors, building stick forts, chasing frogs and digging in the dirt aren’t just fun, they actually help children develop emotionally and intellectually. Rachel Carson, author of A Sense of Wonder, wrote that “If a child is to keep alive his inborn sense of wonder, he needs the companionship of at least one adult who can share it, rediscovering with him the joy, excitement and mystery of the world we live in.” This fall, Adkins Arboretum invites the whole family to spend fun-filled afternoons outdoors with environmental educator Coreen Weilminster, learning about gardening, seasonal interests and the natural history of Maryland’s Eastern Shore while discovering their own sense of wonder and their place in the natural world.

For more information or to register, call 410-634-2847, ext. 0

Getting Ready for Winter: What Plants and Animals are Doing to Prepare for the Colder Months
Sun., Oct 26, 11 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Fee: $5/person members, $7/person general public
Survival is the name of the game in nature. Plants and animals have unique ways to survive, including how they gear up for the cold months of winter. While exploring the Arboretum, learn why a tree loses leaves (and why those leaves change color), what “true hibernators” live in Maryland and which animals migrate. Pack a lunch and dress for both indoor and outdoor activities.

Winter Solstice: The Return of the Sun
Sun., Dec. 7, 11 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Fee: $5/person members, $7/person general public; $10 materials fee/family
Today the Winter Solstice marks the shortest day of the year. To ancient peoples whose lives were intimately fixed to the seasons and the cycle of the harvest, it was heralded as a turning point, the day marking the return of the sun. Families will learn how holiday traditions of candles, evergreens, feasting and generosity are deeply rooted in the rites used to celebrate the sun’s return. Examine the science of the shortest day and make natural ornaments for taking home and for decorating some of the Arboretum’s pines for winter birds. Hot cocoa and cider will be served. Pack a lunch and dress for both indoor and outdoor activities.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. Through its Campaign to Build a Green Legacy, the Arboretum will build a new LEED-certified Arboretum Center and entranceway to broaden educational offerings and research initiatives promoting best practices in conservation and land stewardship. For additional information about Arboretum programs, visit www.adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

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