Tag Archives: Center for Integrative Medicine

Center for Integrative Medicine Partners Offers Specialized Massage Services for Cancer Patients

As cancer continues to affect the quality of life for residents on the Mid Shore, Shore Regional Cancer Center is partnering with Shore Health System’s Center for Integrative Medicine to develop new services to address the needs of cancer patients. Within the past three years, specialties have emerged within certain modalities of complementary medicine, including massage therapy, acupuncture and guided imagery, which are proving to be effective in helping cancer patients cope with their diseases.

Locally, licensed massage therapists, Colin Perry and Stephanie Latham at Shore Health System’s Center for Integrative Medicine, have acquired specialty certifications in order to better assist cancer patients in their treatment and recovery. Both are nationally certified in therapeutic massage.Colin Perry, LMT, CLT, who has been practicing massage since 2007 completed a 157-hour certification program in Complete Decongestive Therapy at the Norton School of Lymphatic Therapy in 2011. This modality enables her to perform manual lymph drainage, addressing the medical needs of cancer survivors, as well as people suffering from chronic pain, migraines, and allergies. The therapists also work with Shore Health System’s Wound Center to help patients with chronic lymphedema.

Perry comments, “Lymphatic massage can help cancer patients with pre-treatment, helping their immune system to accept the treatment; during treatment, to help maintain the immune system; and post-treatment, to help the immune system flush the chemotherapy chemicals out of the body. It can be used with all types of cancers, including breast, colon, tongue and throat cancers.”

Perry explains that cancer survivors often suffer from lymphedema because lymph nodes are often removed in cancer surgeries and the body is not able to absorb the excess lymph fluid, thus causing lymphedema. Swelling from lymphedema may cause pain, discomfort, loss of motion and/or function associated with the affected limb, poor body image, and increased risk of infection. Manual lymph drainage helps manually drain the excess lymph fluid to reduce the swelling associated with lymphedema. This is common among breast cancer patients who may have several lymph nodes removed during surgery.

The Center for Integrative Medicine has begun a new collaboration with Shore Regional Cancer Center’s innovative CARES program. Cancer Recovery & Survivorship Program (CARES), a formalized pathway to cancer rehabilitation, puts patients in touch with support groups, community resources and services for healthier living – including the Center’s massage and acupuncture services.

Stephanie Latham, LMT, has been practicing massage since 2005. She is also trained in oncology massage and is a certified member of the Society for Oncology Massage. She completed over 50 hours in oncology massage training and uses massage to support her patients physically and emotionally as they move through cancer treatment into survivorship.
She comments, “There is a misconception that you can’t have massage if you have cancer. Massage is safe for someone with cancer when the proper techniques are used by a trained therapist. Oncology massage is the adaptation of massage to safely nurture the body, mind and spirit of anyone dealing with cancer. Massage is not only safe, it is beneficial for anyone dealing with the side effects of treatment, such as insomnia, depression, fatigue, bone pain and neuropathy.”

For cancer survivor Beth Hurley of Hurlock, an employee of Shore Health System’s Rehabilitation Services Department, the Center for Integrative Medicine helped her in 2012 during her treatment for stage three colon cancer. Hurley reached out to Perry and Latham as she faced severe symptoms from her chemotherapy, including neuropathy in her hands and feet, lymphedema, and nausea.

She comments, “They really helped my inner spirit and helped me cope with the symptoms from the chemotherapy. When I left my appointment at the Center, all of the anxiety from the chemotherapy went away and I felt relaxed. Mentally, I couldn’t have done it without their support. I was even able to work every day through my treatments.” Hurley has continued with her massage even though her treatments are done, getting maintenance treatments every month, which she thinks are well worth it in her continued recovery.

Latham reflects, “Oncology massage is the most rewarding work I have ever done. It is wonderful helping people with cancer live their day- to-day lives. The greatest compliment I have ever received was from a cancer patient who said I helped her feel normal again.”

Monika Armbruster, L. Ac., M. Ac., Clinical Acupuncture Specialist, who oversees the Center for Integrative Medicine, adds, “Our services are growing since we opened in 2000. Our commitment to meeting the needs of the community is evidenced by our massage therapists taking the extra courses needed to enrich their practices, while enhancing the well-being of our community. The Center can offer clients an interdisciplinary approach, providing complementary services to achieve their optimal health.”

For further information about Shore Healthy System’s Center for Integrative Medicine, contact them at 410-770-9400.

 

Shore Health System Integrative Medicine Center Offers Massage for Cancer Patients

The Center for Integrative Medicine in Easton has added oncology massage to its menu of services. Offered by licensed massage therapist Stephanie Latham, this relaxing therapeutic treatment helps relieve the stress associated a cancer diagnosis.

“Oncology massage is really coming to the forefront,” says Latham. “Research-based studies show that it helps reduce anxiety, stress, and the physical effects of chemotherapy, radiation and surgery.”

Latham trained as a massage therapist at the Delaware Learning Institute and has practiced massage therapy since 2005. She joined the Center for Integrative Medicine three years ago and recently completed oncology massage training through the Society for Oncology Massage.

“I’m able to perform massage with adaptation on any stage of cancer, even during a chemotherapy treatment or on the day of radiation,” Latham says. “Different adaptations are used at different stages of cancer. For example, a breast cancer patient who has had a lumpectomy or mastectomy and has completed treatment, including chemo and radiation, will require adaptations because of possible lymph node removal.”

The list of changes that have been reported by patients after receiving oncology massage is impressive and long: improved sleep, reduced stress, reduced pain, improved peripheral neuropathy (numbness or tingling in the extremities), increased mental clarity and reduced post-treatment fatigue. Massage also has been shown to enhance body image, restore hope and promote deep relaxation.

Latham is also another ear for the cancer patients who come to her for massage. “Some patients make massage part of their wellness regime,” Latham says, “even after cancer treatment has ended, because they find it to be so beneficial. Probably one of the best things is that it gives them satisfaction in taking control in part of their healing.”

The Center for Integrative Medicine located at 607-B Dutchman’s Lane in Easton is an affiliate of Shore Health System. To make an appointment with Stephanie Latham and to learn more about other services offered at the center, call 410-77-9400. Also visit www.shorehealth.org/services/intmed.

Center for Integrative Medicine Offers “Eat to Feel Good”

Shore Health System’s Center for Integrative Medicine presents “Eat to Feel Good.” The class meets on Thursday, September 15, 22 and 29 from 6:30 to 8:00 pm at 607-B Dutchman’s Lane in Easton.

In this three-part workshop, participants will learn how to eat for optimal health and vitality. Topics to be covered include digestion of fats, carbohydrates and protein; the body’s natural cycles of digestion, absorption and elimination; and the principles of proper food combining.

The cost of “Eat to Feel Good” is $65. For more information and to register, call the Center for Integrative Medicine, 410-770-9400. To learn more about other programs and services offered through the Center for Integrative Medicine, visit www.shorehealth.org/services/intmed.

Learn About Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction

The Center for Integrative Medicine is offering a free introduction to Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction on Thursday, September 1, 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm at 607-B Dutchman’s Lane in Easton.

The session will be led by Larissa Kitenko, PharmD. A clinical pharmacist for Shore Health System, Dr. Kitenko is an experienced meditation practitioner. She completed the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction teacher training program at the University of Massachusetts.

Research on mindfulness-based stress reduction has shown that this practice can bring about tranquility, mental clarity and the ability to reduce stress. Results have been particularly effective for people experiencing chronic pain, heart problems, high blood pressure, headaches and fatigue.

The lecture will include the opportunity to learn and practice mindfulness-based stress reduction meditation. Participants will also receive information about the next eight-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction course scheduled to begin on Tuesday, September 20.

For more information and to register for the free lecture, call 410-770-9400.

Center for Integrative Medicine Adds New Acupuncture Treatment

Silvia Byerly, L.Ac., an acupuncturist on staff at the Shore Health System Center for Integrative Medicine in Easton, has added “battlefield acupuncture” to her treatment options.

Byerly studied with Air Force physician Col. Richard Niemtzow, MD, the inventor of the battlefield acupuncture protocol. This protocol is used by US military physicians in war zones and back home to help soldiers manage pain. The treatment is now being used successfully in the general population for pain management.

“Depending on the type of medical condition, patients can expect to be pain free for minutes, hours, days or months following a treatment, Byerly says. She uses a similar technique with cancer patients who experience xerostomia or dry mouth

Byerly is enthusiastic about the response she is getting to this treatment technique when working with patients who experience migraines and headaches.

“I have been treating mostly women, some of whom have had severe migraines since their teenage years,” Byerly reports. “Some migraines were longstanding and did not respond well to medications. Acupuncture has made a difference in the frequency, duration and severity of the migraines.”

Byerly adds, “Patients experience no side effects from acupuncture treatments, and instead report a feeling of relaxation and well being.”

On May 24, at 6:30 pm, Byerly is giving a talk about the benefits of acupuncture for individuals with migraines and headaches. The program will be held at the Center for Integrative Medicine in Easton. The presentation is free; registration is required.

The Shore Health System Center for Integrative Medicine is located at 607-B Dutchman’s Lane in Easton. For more information about battlefield acupuncture, contact Silvia Byerly at the Center for Integrative Medicine, 410-770-9400.

Finding Joy in Difficult Times

Beginning on Tuesday, February 22, the Center for Integrative Medicine will be offering “Finding Joy in Difficult Times.” Each session will be held on the fourth Tuesday of the month from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm at the Center for Integrative Medicine, 607-B Dutchman’s Lane in Easton. The cost for each session is $15.

Taught by Larissa Kitenko, PharmD, “Finding Joy in Difficult Times” is designed to support people who are interested in developing and cultivating positive and wholesome states of mind. Each session will focus on a different theme, such as choosing joy, mindfulness meditation, gratitude and finding balance.

“It is possible to train ourselves to open to the goodness that is in us and around us thus allowing ourselves to be more engaged with all of life’s experiences, even the challenging ones,” says Kitenko, who is a clinical pharmacist and a chaplain at Shore Health System. An experienced group facilitator, Kitenko completed the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Teacher Training Program at the University of Massachusetts.

For more information and to register, call, 410-770-9400. Learn more about the Shore Health System Center for Integrative Medicine at www.shorehealth.org/services/intmed.

Center for Integrative Medicine Offers Reiki Training

Shore Health System’s Center for Integrative Medicine is offering a Reiki I training class on Saturday, February 12. The program runs from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. at 607 Dutchman’s Lane, Suite B, in Easton.

“Anyone can learn Reiki regardless of age or health condition,” says instructor Dana Limpert. “Reiki is a gentle touch therapy that accesses universal life energy to promote healing on the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual levels. It does not interfere with conventional medical treatment or alternative therapies.”

Limpert adds, “Reiki is a useful tool for a personal wellness program, and for people already in healthcare professions or care-giving situations.”

After completing the daylong program, participants will be certified as Reiki practitioners through the USUI School of Natural Healing.

The cost of the workshop is $163, which includes tuition and materials. For more information and to register, call the Center for Integrative Medicine, 410-770-9400.

Learn to Eat Mindfully at the Center for Integrative Medicine

Shore Health System’s Center for Integrative Medicine is offering the five-week program “Mindful Eating” beginning Tuesday, May 4 and ending on June 8. The class will not meet on May 18. The program will be held at the Memorial Hospital at Easton, 219 Washington Street, in the Nick Rajacich Health Education Center from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm.

“Mindful eating is about opening the mind’s awareness to our food and to the body, before, during and after we eat,” says program facilitator Larissa Kitenko, PharmD. “In this course, we will explore our relationship to food as well as our habits and patterns by practicing of mindfulness.”

Kitenko, who is a meditation instructor and a trained Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction facilitator, will lead the group in mindful movement and a body scan. She will also teach a form of mindfulness meditation that participants will be encouraged to practice between sessions.

The cost of “Mindful Eating” is $70. For more information and to register, call the Center for Integrative Medicine, 410-770-9400.

Experience a Day of Mindfulness

Shore Health System’s Center for Integrative Medicine is offering “A Day of Mindfulness,” on Saturday, April 10, from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm. The center is located at 607-B Dutchman’s Lane in Easton.

“A Day of Mindfulness” will be led by Larissa Kitenko, a clinical pharmacist and an associate clinical chaplain for Shore Health System. Kitenko is a graduate of the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Teacher Training Program at the University of Massachusetts.

“This workshop is an oasis in the stress of our busy lives,” Kitenko explains. “It is an opportunity to learn a meditation technique that can bring about tranquility, mental clarity and the ability to reduce stress. It can deepen and strengthen mindfulness for those who currently engage in such a practice and provide encouragement for those who have drifted from practicing.”

During the workshop, participants will receive instruction and practice various types of meditation techniques. A portion of the day will be held in silence. Participants should wear comfortable clothing and bring a yoga mat and bag lunch.

Tuition is $65. For more information and to register, call the Center for Integrative Medicine, 410-770-9400.

Lecture Addresses Treatment for Traumatic Grief

On Thursday, March 25, the Center for Integrative Medicine hosts “When Grief Doesn’t Go Away” presented by psychotherapist Richard Gibson, LCSW-C. This free lecture begins at 7:00 pm at 607-B Dutchman’s Lane in Easton.

“When profound grief remains unresolved for many months, or even years, with debilitating symptoms of major depression, substance abuse or post traumatic stress disorder, we describe it as complicated or traumatic grief,” says Gibson, who practices psychotherapy at the Center for Integrative Medicine. “Fortunately, there are treatments for this condition today.”

Gibson will discuss EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing), a well-researched and preferred treatment for post traumatic stress disorder. “EMDR helps desensitize the traumatic loss of a loved one, and perhaps earlier losses of which the death is a reminder, helping the bereaved get ‘unstuck’ and return to normal functioning,” Gibson says.

For more information and to make reservation, call the Center for Integrative Medicine at 410-770-9400.