Tag Archives: e-cigarettes

Talbot Parent Coalition Undertakes Project to Educate Parents and Youth About E-Cigarettes and Flavored Cigars

MK_180x180_TPC_2 imagesTalbot Parent Coalition Undertakes Project to Educate Parents and Youth About E-Cigarettes and Flavored Cigars

The Talbot Parent Coalition, which is part of the Talbot Partnership, has received a grant from the Maryland Cigarette Restitution Fund of the Talbot County Health Department to educate parents and youth about the dangers from flavored e-cigarettes and flavored cigars and their growing use among teens.

“Just as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s latest National Youth Risk Behavior Survey tells us that cigarette smoking has decreased to below 16 percent among high school students, we are facing new threats to our youth’s health from flavored e-cigarettes and flavored cigars,” said Mary Kramer, Chairman of the Talbot Parent Coalition.”

Nationally, e-cigarette use more than doubled among middle school and high school students from 2011 to 2012. More than 75 percent of these users also smoke conventional cigarettes.

“Talbot County is reflective of what is going on in the nation as a whole,” says Kramer. “There is evidence in the County that wherever teenagers gather there will be some who are smoking flavored e-cigarettes or the flavored cigars. We hope to educate parents about this threat and have them join in the effort to understand by making use of the resources available through the Coalition.”

Kramer says the public education effort will be carried out through information on the organization’s Web site, Facebook page, and newsletter. Concerned parents should bookmark the Web site (parentscoalitionoftalbotpartnership.org), follow the TPC Facebook page Talbot Parents Coalition, and subscribe to the free e-newsletter for the most current, ongoing information.  Text TPC + your email address to 16782493375 to subscribe to the e-newsletter.

Just as the federal government is in the process of setting rules that would ban the sale of electronic cigarettes to minors, a new study shows that TV ads for the products have increased dramatically during programs most likely to be watched by adolescents and young adults. According to the study by the journal Pediatrics, exposure to e-cigarette TV ads increased by 256 percent among adolescents ages 12 to 17 and by 321 percent among young adults ages 18 to 24 from 2011 to 2013.

The proliferation of and demand for e-cigarettes – which can be customized by the user using sweet and familiar flavors – has given rise to a new part of the retail industry. E-cigarettes have moved beyond convenience stores to specific businesses that specialize in selling these products.

Flavored cigars also are a looming threat because – like e-cigarettes – they can be altered with familiar candy-like flavors. According to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, there is a disturbing trend in Maryland of underage youth smoking cigars – including cigarillos and little cigars – at the same rate as cigarettes.

A majority of youth e-cigarette and cigar smokers are using flavoring in these products. The sweet flavorings mask the harshness of the tobacco and make the products more enticing. These products are attractive, accessible, and affordable for young people. They come in fruit and candy flavors, in brightly colored wrapping, and they often cost less than an ice cream cone or candy bar.

Many young people wrongly believe that cigars are safer than cigarettes, but all cigars – including those that come in fruit and candy flavors – are addictive and cause cancer and heart disease – just like cigarettes. The jury may be out about the dangers of e-cigarettes, but indications are pointing to them being a gateway to cigarette usage – and that is not a healthy practice.

E-Cigarettes, by Other Names, Lure Young and Worry Experts

ecigE-Cigarettes, by Other Names, Lure Young and Worry Experts

E-cigarettes are increasingly popular battery-operated devices marketed as a safer alternative to smoking conventional cigarettes. They produce flavored nicotine aerosol that looks and feels like tobacco smoke but without the tar or other chemicals produced by burning tobacco leaves. However, while e-cigarettes do not produce tobacco smoke, it is still unclear how safe they are. They still deliver nicotine, which is a highly addictive drug.

Along with e-cigarettes, other products such as “hookah pens” or “e-hookahs” or “vape pipes” are enticing youth and new users. These devices are part of a subgenre of the fast-growing e-cigarette market and are being shrewdly marketed to avoid the stigma associated with cigarettes of any kind. The products, which are exploding in popularity, come in a rainbow of colors and candy-sweet flavors but, beneath the surface, they are often virtually identical to e-cigarettes, right down to their addictive nicotine and unregulated swirl of other chemicals.

Also, vapor from some e-cigarette products has been found to contain known carcinogens and toxic chemicals. Until more studies are conducted, there is no way of knowing what the health consequences of repeated exposure to these chemicals may be, whether e-cigarettes are any safer than conventional cigarettes, or if they are useful to help a person quit smoking.

Public health authorities worry that people are being drawn to products that intentionally avoid the term “e-cigarette.” Of particular concern is use among teenagers, many of whom appear to view e-cigarettes and e-hookahs as entirely different products when, for all practical purposes, they are often indistinguishable.

According to Talbot Partnership for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Prevention, a further concern over the rising popularity of electronic cigarettes is that young people are increasingly using e-cigarettes to smoke marijuana.

Talbot Partnership officials say it’s important for parents to talk about the dangers of the E-cigarettes and marijuana with your kids. For further information on the dangers of alcohol and other drugs, contact Talbot Partnership at 410-819-8067. Please also visit our website at www.talbotpartnership.org or find us on Facebook.

 

Youth Using E-Cigarettes to Smoke Marijuana

clip_image002[2] (59 x 72)According to Talbot Partnership for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Prevention, a new concern over the rising popularity of electronic cigarettes is that young people are now increasingly using e-cigarettes to smoke marijuana.

People are smoking marijuana out of e-cigarettes and vapor pens – right out in the open with little or no fear of getting caught. Rather than the traditional smoked marijuana, people are smoking the liquid and wax forms of marijuana which doesn’t emit the telltale odor as when it is smoked.

Regardless of how marijuana is ingested, the dangers are the same. The short term effects include impaired coordination; skewed sensory and time perception; difficulty with thinking, concentrating and problem solving; shortened attention span and distractibility; decreased alertness; impaired learning and memory; and euphoria. Long-term users often experience lowered motivation, anxiety, panic attacks, respiratory illnesses, and increased heart rate and risk of heart attack. .

Chronic marijuana use can lead to addiction. In fact, marijuana is the most commonly used illegal drug in the United States, and more teens are in treatment with a primary diagnosis of marijuana dependence than for all other illegal drugs combined.

Legal and public health officials are increasingly calling for tighter controls of electronic cigarettes as questions arise about the hazards they may pose to users and those exposed to secondhand vapor.

Talbot Partnership officials say it’s important for parents to talk about the dangers of the E-cigarettes and marijuana with your kids. For further information on the dangers of alcohol and other drugs, contact Talbot Partnership at 410-819-8067. Please also visit our website at www.talbotpartnership.org or find us on Facebook.