Tag Archives: Eastern Shore Writers Association

Jamie Brown: “How NOT to Get Published”

November 9, 2013, at 11 a.m.
The Georgia House, 119 Main Street(off Rt. 113 – 25 miles from Salisbury, MD and 9 miles from Georgetown, DE), Millsboro, DE 19966
(302) 934-6737
Broadkill Review Publisher Jamie Brown will share “How NOT to Get Published” with the Eastern Shore Writers’ Association on November 9, 2013, at 11:00 a.m., at the Georgia House located in Millsboro, DE. This event is open to the public; however, an RSVP to sweeneygf@aol.com or (410) 490-6357 is necessary for the lunch ($17). Mapquesting this location is strongly urged.

“I will happily regale the group with mistakes that people make with the presentation of their work, or with the subject of their work, or with the treatment of the subject of their work,” Jamie says, as well as “the most important things you can avoid as a writer sharing your work.” Referring to himself as a self-made editor, Jamie is ready to confess it all for the benefit of the writers attending November’s meeting. Learn how to delight editors and become their favorite by being the writer that makes their job easier rather than more difficult. Enjoy the funny side of other writers’ mistakes and get the tools to ensure fewer “We love your work BUT” letters hitting your mailbox. This presentation is sure to engage and improve writers of all ages and backgrounds. Don’t miss it.

Publisher, poet, professor, shopkeep, and founder of the John Milton Poetry Festival and Poetry Prize – all of these are inadequate to describe the range of Jamie Brown’s talent and experience. Former editor of several literary magazines and prize-winning playwright, Brown’s fiction, non-fiction and poetry have been widely published including such favorites as Freeholder and Other Poems and Conventional Heresies. He received his MFA from American University in 1987. He and his brother, the noted actor David Palmer Brown of New York, founded the Northwest Educational Workshop Theater (for Teens) in 1990, and Jamie also founded and coordinated two well-known Washington, D.C. poetry reading series as well as teaching an Advanced Fiction Workshop at Georgetown University and an introductory-level workshop in poetry, “Poetry: Form, Function and You” at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

An effective teacher, Jamie’s students are regularly published. He has read from his poetry and fiction at many impressive venues including the Writer’s Center in Montgomery County Maryland.

The Eastern Shore Writers’ Association (ESWA) holds monthly writing programs, sponsors the Bay to Ocean Writers Conference, publishes The Delmarva Review, and supports Delmarva Public Radio’s “Delmarva Today: Writer’s Edition.” As a nonprofit organization, it supports writers and the literary arts across the Delmarva Peninsula. For more information, see the ESWA website www.easternshorewriters.org, visit the ESWA blog at www.easternshorewritersassociation.wordpress.com, or email Gerald F. Sweeney, President, ESWA, at sweeneygf@aol.com. Those without computer access are welcome to contact Michelle Danelle Sebly at 410.490.6357.

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Aligning With The Muse: The (secret) Joys of Revision

October 12, 2013, at 11 a.m.
Fratelli’s Italian Restaurant, 1309 S. Salisbury Blvd., (near the university on Rt. 13), Salisbury, MD 21801
(410) 341-0807

MD Poet Laureate Michael S. Glaser speaks at 11 a.m., at Fratelli’s Restaurant in Salisbury, MD. All writers and guests are welcome to attend this free event.

“Aligning with the Muse” will be an interactive presentation that focuses on those qualities that make writing magical and captivating, while still distinguishing between “the writing business” and the “business of writing.” Several of Michael Glaser’s books will be available for sale at the meeting, among them two anthologies he edited, Weavings 2000: The Maryland Millennial Anthology and Come Celebrate with Me: A VOICES memorial tribute to Lucille Clifton, as well as a few collections of his own writing including Fire Before the Hands (winner of the 2007 Anabiosis Press Chapbook Contest) and disrupting consensus (the 2008 Teacher’s Voice Chapbook Winner). Mr. Glaser looks “forward to staying for lunch and talking with ESWA members.”

In addition to serving as Poet Laureate of Maryland from 2004-2009, Michael S. Glaser is a Professor Emeritus at St. Mary’s College of Maryland where he served as both a professor of English and an administrator for nearly 40 years. A recipient of the Homer Dodge Endowed Award for Excellence in Teaching, Glaser is widely sought as a speaker, workshop and retreat leader. His current interests include exploring the interdependent nurturing that derives from mindful writing and attentive self-reflection.

Over 500 of Glaser’s poems have been published in such literary journals and newspapers as the American Scholar, New Letters, Prairie Schooner, Christian Science Monitor, The Antioch Review, The Progressive Magazine and Sacred Journey, as well as in numerous anthologies including Unsettling America (Viking Penguin), Outsiders (Milkweed Editions) and Light Gathering Poems (Holt).

His works include A Lover’s Eye (The Bunny & Crocodile Press), In the Men’s Room and Other Poems which was the winner of the 1996 Painted Bride Quarterly chapbook competition, and Being a Father (2004). Most recently, Glaser served as co-editor, with Kevin Young, of the Collected Poems of Lucille Clifton (BOA, 2012).

Born in Chicago, Illinois in 1943, Glaser received his B.A. from Denison University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Kent State University. He lives in St. Mary’s City, Maryland with his wife, the educator Kathleen W. Glaser who works with the Center for Courage and Renewal. He is the proud father of five grown children, Brian, Joshua, Daniel, Amira and Eva, and nine grandchildren.

All are welcome to stay and chat with Michael after the presentation. Spend some time sampling Fratelli’s famous award winning crab cakes and homemade pasta while developing relationships with writers of like mind, making valuable professional connections, sharing information, and just having fun on a Saturday afternoon.

The Eastern Shore Writers’ Association (ESWA) holds monthly writing programs, sponsors the Bay to Ocean Writers Conference, and publishes The Delmarva Review, a literary journal for all writers. As a nonprofit organization, it supports writers and the literary arts across the Delmarva Peninsula. For more information, see the ESWA website www.easternshorewriters.org, visit the ESWA blog at www.easternshorewritersassociation.wordpress.com, or email Gerald F. Sweeney, President, ESWA, at sweeneygf@aol.com.

Aligning With the Muse: The (secret) Joys of Revision

October 12, 2013, at 11 a.m.
Fratelli’s Italian Restaurant, 1309 S. Salisbury Blvd., (near the university on Rt. 13)
Salisbury, MD 21801
(410) 341-0807

MD Poet Laureate from 2004-2009 Michael Glaser talks about “Aligning with the Muse: The (secret) Joys of Revision” on October 12, 2013, at 11:00 a.m., in Fratelli’s Italian Restaurant of Salisbury, MD. All writers and guests are welcome to attend this free event.

“Aligning with the Muse” will be an interactive presentation that focuses on those qualities that make writing magical and captivating, while still distinguishing between “the writing business” and the “business of writing.” Several of Michael Glaser’s books will be available for sale at the meeting, among them two anthologies he edited, Weavings 2000: The Maryland Millennial Anthology and Come Celebrate with Me: A VOICES memorial tribute to Lucille Clifton, as well as a few collections of his own writing including Fire Before the Hands (winner of the 2007 Anabiosis Press Chapbook Contest) and disrupting consensus (the 2008 Teacher’s Voice Chapbook Winner). Mr. Glaser looks “forward to staying for lunch and talking with ESWA members.”

In addition to serving as Poet Laureate of Maryland from 2004-2009, Michael Glaser is a Professor Emeritus at St. Mary’s College of Maryland where he served as both a professor of English and an administrator for nearly 40 years. A recipient of the Homer Dodge Endowed Award for Excellence in Teaching, Glaser is widely sought as a speaker, workshop and retreat leader. His current interests include exploring the interdependent nurturing that derives from mindful writing and attentive self-reflection.

Over 500 of Glaser’s poems have been published in such literary journals and newspapers as the American Scholar, New Letters, Prairie Schooner, Christian Science Monitor, The Antioch Review, The Progressive Magazine and Sacred Journey, as well as in numerous anthologies including Unsettling America (Viking Penguin), Outsiders (Milkweed Editions) and Light Gathering Poems (Holt).

His works include A Lover’s Eye (The Bunny & Crocodile Press), In the Men’s Room and Other Poems which was the winner of the 1996 Painted Bride Quarterly chapbook competition, and Being a Father (2004). Most recently, Glaser served as co-editor, with Kevin Young, of the Collected Poems of Lucille Clifton (BOA, 2012).
Born in Chicago, Illinois in 1943, Glaser received his B.A. from Denison University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Kent State University. He lives in St. Mary’s City, Maryland with his wife, the educator Kathleen W. Glaser who works with the Center for Courage and Renewal. He is the proud father of five grown children, Brian, Joshua, Daniel, Amira and Eva, and nine grandchildren.

All are welcome to stay and chat with Michael after the presentation. Spend some time sampling Fratelli’s famous award winning crab cakes and homemade pasta while developing relationships with writers of like mind, making valuable professional connections, sharing information, and just having fun on a Saturday afternoon.

The Eastern Shore Writers’ Association (ESWA) holds monthly writing programs, sponsors the Bay to Ocean Writers Conference, and publishes The Delmarva Review, a literary journal for all writers. As a nonprofit organization, it supports writers and the literary arts across the Delmarva Peninsula. For more information, see the ESWA website www.easternshorewriters.org, visit the ESWA blog at www.easternshorewritersassociation.wordpress.com, or email Gerald F. Sweeney, President, ESWA, at sweeneygf@aol.com.

“The Power of Insinuation in Speaking & Writing”

September 14, 2013, at 11 a.m.
Scossa’s Restaurant and Lounge, 8 N. Washington Street, Easton, MD
(410) 822-2202
Author David Mercier shares “The Power of Insinuation in Speaking and Writing” on September 14, 2013, at 11:00 a.m., at Scossa’s Restaurant and Lounge in Easton, MD. Writers, guests, and the general public are welcome to attend this free event and stay for the networking lunch held afterward.

Easton resident and award-winning author David Mercier returns to kick off the Eastern Shore Writers’ Association’s new year and first get-together with inspiring new words of wisdom and autographed copies of A Beautiful Medicine available for purchase. Discussing “The Power of Insinuation in Speaking and Writing”, David will illustrate how “much of the truth in communication happens under the radar of the spoken and written word.” He will guide members and guests in how understanding “the implications that we continually make, often unintentionally, is essential in learning to communicate in the best way possible, both in speaking and writing.” By the end of the meeting listeners will learn how to be more identify these implications and then how to be more conscious of them in order to use them to their advantage.

“My passion is for evoking the soul of human experience,” David says, “and my purpose is to present lectures and workshops that are warm, informal, light-hearted but substantive. Inspiring and illuminating, they add value to the lives of the listeners in substantive ways . . . the concepts are always made practical, and listeners will learn specific tools they can implement immediately in their lives.”

Author of the award-winning book A Beautiful Medicine – a Radical Look at the Essence of Health and Healing (Still Pond Press, 2012), David has also been published in Orthopedic Technology Review, The Journal of Maryland Acupuncture Society, and a variety of newspapers and publications.
An experienced lecturer on acupuncture, health and healing, David is a graduate of the Tai Sophia Institute in Laurel, and holds a Master’s Degree in Organization Development from the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University.

“Many of my colleagues and volunteers have begun practicing David’s ideas and it’s made a tremendous difference in the way they approach their lives and their work,” Susan Piggot, Volunteer Coordinator at the Talbot Hospice Foundation said regarding his presentation to her organization.

All are welcome to linger over “the delectable food and wine of Scossa Restaurant and Lounge” while developing relationships with writers of like mind, making valuable connections, sharing information, and building partnerships to support career goals.

The Eastern Shore Writers’ Association (ESWA) holds monthly writing programs, sponsors the Bay to Ocean Writers Conference, and publishes The Delmarva Review, a literary journal for all writers. As a nonprofit organization, it supports writers and the literary arts across the Delmarva Peninsula. For more information, see the ESWA website www.easternshorewriters.org, or email Gerald F. Sweeney, President, ESWA, at sweeneygf@aol.com.

Working the Literary Imagination: Reading & Talking, Thinking and Writing

June 8, 2013, at 11 a.m.
Scossa Restaurant, 8 N. Washington Street, Easton, MD 21601
(410) 822-2202

W. Braithwaite (300 x 400)William T. Braithwaite, Tutor (all professors are called Tutors) at St. Johns College in Annapolis, MD demonstrates how we can improve and train our “Literary Imagination” on June 8, 2013 from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at Scossa Restaurant and Lounge in Easton, MD.

Can we train, or develop the imagination? William Braithwaite proposes that we can and illustrates how it can be done in this, the Eastern Shore Writers Association’s end of year and not to be missed gathering at Scossa’s Restaurant.

Beginning by sharing the unconventional liberal-education program at St. John’s College, Annapolis with members and guests, he describes how the students are taught to write regularly in all classes about what they are learning, as well as penning a long annual essay each year of their college career. Weaving the strands of connection together, Mr. Braithwaite teaches attendees what he himself has learned about how to “train” the imagination to show its best face in our writing. He does this by drawing on his 18 years of experience teaching Legal Writing in law school and helping St. John’s students write their many essays. By the end of the session writers will understand why Mr. Braithwaite so strongly believes we can indeed improve our literary imaginations, and why the coherent practices of reading and talking, thinking and writing, seem to help us do it.

He speculates that “close reading of old or well-known stories can help us think about how the greatest writers, poets, and story-tellers use the imagination,” then eloquently describing it as “that place and power in the mind where abstract thinking meets sense-perception, providing a space-like “theater” for dreams, memories, and other visualized dramas of inner life.”

William Braithwaite is a Tutor at St. John’s College, Annapolis, where he currently teaches Literature, Philosophy, Mathematics, and Music. His special study at present is the obscene in comedy, focusing on Aristophanes. Before joining the St. John’s faculty in 1995, Mr. Braithwaite taught law for 15 years at Loyola University, Chicago as well as teaching seminars on Mosaic Law and Oral Argument, and leading seminars on Law and Literature for the Illinois Judicial Conference and the Chicago Bar Association. Mr. Braithwaite’s publications include “The Idea of Punishment in Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure, and he is a co-editor of Law and Philosophy: The Practice of Theory (Ohio University Press). An ex-military man and odd job connoisseur, he lives in Annapolis with his wife Wendy, a middle-school librarian; his six sons live and work in a variety of interesting places and occupations.

All writers and guests are welcome to attend this free event. An RSVP is not required, but always appreciated, to: jreveal@verizon.net. The Eastern Shore Writers’ Association (ESWA) holds monthly writing programs, sponsors the Bay to Ocean Writers Conference every February, and publishes The Delmarva Review, a literary journal for all writers. As a nonprofit organization, it supports writers and the literary arts across the Delmarva Peninsula. For more information, see the ESWA website www.easternshorewriters.org, or write Hal Wilson, President, ESWA, P.O. Box 1773, Easton, MD 21601.

Upcoming Events With the ESWA

“What will you write about today?”
Free and open to the public, the Writer’s Association hosts monthly meetings (excluding July and August), on the second Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Two additional workshops are included this spring. The meetings rotate between locations around the Delmarva Peninsula, as a convenience to members and public alike. Informal in atmosphere, the programs cover topics of interest and value to writers and general public, as well as public readings. Topics are presented by professionals in the business, including published authors, magazine editors, key political figures, local entertainers, and television and radio personalities. An optional lunch follows the presentations, allowing time for networking among writers, speakers, and guests.

 

St. Michaels, MD, Saturday, April 13, 2013 at 11:00 a.m.: Award winning author Laura Oliver will address “Adding Humor to the Personal Essay: Ten Easy Tips” for the Eastern Shore Writers Association at 11 a.m., Saturday, April 13, at the Town Dock Restaurant, 125 Mulberry Street in St. Michaels, MD (410-745-5577).

The program is free and open to the public. All writers and guests are welcome to attend this free event. An RSVP is not required, but always appreciated, to: jreveal@verizon.net. For more information, see the ESWA website www.easternshorewriters.org,or write Hal Wilson, President, ESWA, P.O. Box 1773, Easton, MD 21601.

 

Easton, MD, Saturday, May 4, 2013 at 9:00 am.: Award-winning poet Sue Ellen Thompson will conduct a Poetry Workshop entitled “How to End a Poem” on May 4 at Christ Church in Easton from 9-11:30am. A nationally-known literary treasure, Ms. Thompson is the author of four books of poetry. Two of her collections, The Leaving and The Golden Hour, were nominated for a Pulitzer Prize.

“It’s at the end of a poem where the magic happens,” says Ms. Thompson. “It can be a surprise leap to another level or a quiet affirmation.” The Poetry Workshop will be held in the church hall at 111 S. Harrison St. on the southern edge of Easton village.

Writers who wish to attend should send a check to Charlene Marcom, Treasurer, ESWA, P.O. Box 1773, Easton, MD 21601. Drop-ins are also welcome. The charge for each workshop is $15 for ESWA members and $20 for non-members. Registrants should include their e-mail address. Further information is also available at sweeneygf@aol.com or (410) 476-3917.

 

 

Salisbury, MD, Saturday, May 11, 2013 at 11:00 am.: Join Museum & Arts Washington Publisher Amy Abrams as she discusses “Succeeding as a Freelance Writer” with members and guests of the Eastern Shore Writer’s Association on Saturday May 11, at 11 a.m. at Fratelli’s Italian Restaurant at 1309 S. Salisbury Blvd. in Salisbury, MD, 21801 (410-341-0807).

The program is free and open to the public. All writers and guests are welcome to attend this free event. An RSVP is not required, but always appreciated, to: jreveal@verizon.net. For more information, see the ESWA website www.easternshorewriters.org,or write Hal Wilson, President, ESWA, P.O. Box 1773, Easton, MD 21601.
The Eastern Shore Writer’s Association also sponsors the Bay to Ocean Writers Conference every February, as well as publishes The Delmarva Review, a literary journal for all types of writers. As a nonprofit organization, it supports writers and the literary arts across the Delmarva Peninsula. For more information, see the ESWA website www.easternshorewriters.org, or write Hal Wilson, President, ESWA, P.O. Box 1773, Easton, MD 21601.

 

Storytellers Gather in Easton

lynn schwartz 3 (400 x 265)Are you one of those storytellers who want to publish a book that includes your best tales?

A good place to start is by attending Lynn Schwartz’s workshop— “Ten Steps to a Great Tale.” Ms. Schwartz, one of the most popular faculty members at the recently-held Bay-to-Ocean Writers Conference, will be conducting a morning workshop (9:00 -11:30am) on Saturday, April 6 at the Trinity Cathedral in Easton. The address is 315 Goldsborough St.

She discusses the necessary elements that make your story compelling, resonant and accessible to the reader. Learn to identify where to begin, how to end, and the skills needed to traverse the murky middle. The session is tailored to those writing short stories, novels and those who wish to incorporate fictional techniques in memoir. Ms. Scwartz’s website is www.writerswordhouse.com

The fee is $20 for non-ESWA (www.easternshorewriters.org). $15 for members. Please send a check to Charlene Marcom, ESWA, P.O. Box 1773, Easton, MD 21601 or call (410) 476-3917.

 

Adding Humor to the Personal Essay: Ten Easy Tips

April 13, 2013, at 11 a.m.
Town Dock Restaurant, 125 Mulberry Street, (on the St. Michaels harbor), St. Michaels, MD 21663
(410) 745-5577

LauraOliver4Web (300 x 384)Award winning author Laura Oliver will address “Adding Humor to the Personal Essay: Ten Easy Tips” for the Eastern Shore Writers Association at 11 a.m., Saturday, April 13, at the Town Dock Restaurant, 125 Mulberry Street in St. Michaels, MD (410-745-5577). The program is free and open to the public.

This month’s meeting, held in “the heart of the harbor” of historic waterfront village St. Michaels, offers amazing views for writers and guests alike while Laura shares her expertise in the field. Eastern Shore writers are invited to learn how to elevate any literary work with the inclusion of humor. “Even poignant personal essays become more memorable when you have mastered this useful and versatile skill,” says Oliver. “This is a rare opportunity to learn the how-to of literary humor writing and to have fun while doing it. As W. H. Auden said: ‘Among those whom I like, I can find no common denominator, but among those whom I love, I can; all of them make me laugh.’ This talk will demonstrate the transformative power of humor and how to create it.” It will be both instructive and inspiring for all involved!

Laura Oliver is the author of The Story Within: New Insights and Inspiration for Writers (Penguin) which was chosen as one of the best writing books of the year by Poets and Writers and The Writer Magazine. Her essays and short stories appear in numerous regional and national periodicals such as The Washington Post, Country Living, The SUN Magazine and Glimmer Train. She has taught Creative Writing at the University of Maryland and currently teaches writing at St. John’s College and The Writer’s Center. Nominated for a Pushcart Prize, her work has won numerous distinctions, including a Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award in Fiction and Arts Council of Anne Arundel County Annie Award. Her M.F.A. is from Bennington College. Writers can learn more about her at her website,www.thestorywithin.com.

All writers and guests are welcome to attend this free event. An RSVP is not required, but always appreciated, to: jreveal@verizon.net.

The Eastern Shore Writers’ Association (ESWA) holds monthly writing programs, sponsors the Bay to Ocean Writers Conference every February, and publishes The Delmarva Review, a literary journal for all writers. As a nonprofit organization, it supports writers and the literary arts across the Delmarva Peninsula. For more information, see the ESWA website www.easternshorewriters.org,or write Hal Wilson, President, ESWA, P.O. Box 1773, Easton, MD 21601.

 

Eastern Shore Writer’s Association Workshop

Lynn Schwartz, one of the leading literary lights of the Bay-to-Ocean Writer’s Conference, has been helping novelists and short storytellers perfect their craft for years. She will bring her talent to Easton on April 6th to conduct an Eastern Shore Writers Association (ESWA)-sponsored workshop entitled “Fiction: Ten Steps to a Great Tale.” Lynn, a transplanted New Yorker who always wanted to live by the water, found romance ten years ago in Annapolis and is now living the good life by the bay.

Before coming here, she took the long way around through Manhattan’s theater district. Lynn, in awe of Tennessee Williams, arrived in Manhattan at 19 determined to become an actress. She enrolled in the Neighborhood Playhouse and that’s where she learned her theater craft. Sanford Meisner, who led the acting department there, was a mighty force on Broadway in those years. He had been influenced by the Group Theater who in turn had been influenced by Stanislavsky. After spending two years at the school that boasted such alumni as Gregory Peck and Diane Keaton, the curly-haired redhead was caught in a casting dilemma somewhere between the blonde ingénues and freckled-face character actors. She learned that her best auditions resulted from monologues that she created for herself, and the response to her writing was so great that soon other actors were asking her to compose dialogues for them. Writing since she was a child, her sense of drama and love of dialogue sprang from her theater background. She pursued her writing talent at Columbia where she came under the influence of Gordon Lish (who edited Raymond Carver at Knopf). She believes he helped teach her that every word counts. For her Master’s degree, she enrolled at CCNY where she was mentored by poet William Matthews (National Book Critics Circle Award), who taught her to respect precision of language. Her plays and staged readings have been performed in Atlanta and in New York City including the Bruno Walter Auditorium at Lincoln Center.

Like many theater enthusiasts, Lynn became involved in the downtown creative and dining scene in the 1980’s. Inspired by Pop-Art painters, Off-Broadway and Joe Papp’s Public Theater (Producer of the Shakespeare Marathon that ran 37 of the Bard’s plays over a nine-year period), the Soho and Noho neighborhoods of lower Manhattan bloomed with creative life. Here Lynn and her associates operated the Temple Bar, a noted hotspot, where on Sunday Night, Lynn held a salon for famous writers to read and advise the writing community.

Then came love and she followed her heart to Annapolis. There she founded the Writer’s Wordhouse (www.writerswordhouse.com) which offers writing and creative workshops, teleseminars via teleconference calls and private development coaching. A story development editor, she holds seminars and workshops as far away as Connecticut. Lynn also teaches fiction at St. John’s College and at the Writer’s Center in Bethesda and Annapolis.

Her advice to prospective writers is to persevere. She is a firm believer that everyone has a story to tell and should share it. She knows that the more time people spend writing, the more they will improve. But they have to perform and stick to their computers. They have to write. And then write some more. It’s the old “perspiration not inspiration” theory that brings success and sometimes leads to publication. She’s helped hundreds of writers accomplish their goals.

For instance, her advice for publishing short stories is to keep submitting to all the literary journals now that they are less demanding about multiple submissions. She recommends sending to the old standards as well as the new on-line outlets. One suggestion from Lynn is that writers try to place their work by using the “Poets and Writer” database as well as the one from Duotrope.

“Sooner or later, their stories will be accepted. But writers have to pay attention. They have to take the time to research what might be an appropriate home for their stories.”

The eager-eyed nineteen year-old who arrived on Broadway years ago has transformed herself into a wise teacher, who still has the enthusiasm and electric magnetism to hold audiences in the palm of her elegant writing hand.

Lynn offers a wealth of information to writers. To attend her workshop at Trinity Church (Goldsborough St.) Easton on Saturday, April 6th between 9-11:30, send $20 ($15 for ESWA members) to Charlene Marcom, ESWA, P.O.Box 1773, Easton, MD, 21601, or check www.easternshorewriters.org.

 

Two Writers’ Workshops Set For Spring

In an effort to enhance the quality of creative writing on Delmarva, Hal Wilson, the President of the Eastern Shore Writers Association (ESWA) announces the inauguration of two workshops, one for fiction and another for poetry. Prospective novelists and short story writers can improve their craft under the mentorship of Lynn Schwartz and poets with Sue Ellen Thompson.

Bay-to-Ocean Conference favorite Lynn Schwartz will conduct a seminar entitled “Fiction: Ten Steps to a Great Tale“ on Saturday, April 6 at Trinity Cathedral in Easton from 9-11:30am. Ms. Schwartz is the founder of Writer’s Wordhouse and teaches fiction at St. John’s College and The Writer’s Center in Bethesda. Her plays have been performed in New York City including Lincoln Center, her stories have appeared in literary journals, and she is the recipient of an Individual Artist Award in fiction from the Maryland State Arts Council.

“I invite Eastern Shore writers who wish to advance their skills to gather for a fun and informative workshop,” Ms. Schwartz says. “Participants will leave inspired to finally begin a new story or to improve a work in progress.” Ms. Schwartz’s workshop will be held in the church hall behind the cathedral which is located at 315 Goldsborough Street near Easton village (Goldsborough is an extension of Route #328).

Award-winning poet Sue Ellen Thompson will conduct a Poetry Workshop entitled “How to End a Poem” on May 4 at Christ Church in Easton from 9-11:30am. A nationally-known literary treasure, Ms. Thompson is the author of four books of poetry. Two of her collections, The Leaving and The Golden Hour, were nominated for a Pulitzer Prize.

“It’s at the end of a poem where the magic happens,” says Ms. Thompson. “It can be a surprise leap to another level or a quiet affirmation.”The Poetry Workshop will be held in the church hall at 111 S. Harrison St. on the southern edge of Easton village.

Writers who wish to attend either or both of these workshops should send a check to Charlene Marcom, Treasurer, ESWA, P.O. Box 1773, Easton, MD 21601. The charge for each workshop is $15 for ESWA members and $20 for non-members. Registrants should include their e-mail address. Further information is also available at sweeneygf@aol.com or (410) 476-3917.