Tag Archives: nature program

Catch a Glimpse of Spring Ephemerals During Programs at Adkins Arboretum

_ASR1040 bluebells 4x6x300 2 (267 x 400)Spring beauty, dwarf crested iris, foamflower, Virginia bluebell. First thing in spring, this dazzling diversity of flowers emerges, but many are gone in the blink of an eye. These and many others are spring ephemerals, perennial plants that emerge quickly in spring, flower, fruit, and then die back after a short growth and reproduction phase. Beginning this weekend, Adkins Arboretum will offer three programs for viewing these fleeting and lovely harbingers of spring.

Join a walk to find early spring flowers when Arboretum Science Advisor Mary Travaglini offers Spring Ephemerals—The Fleeting Flowers on Sun., April 21 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Active as an outdoor educator, landscape architect and ecologist, Travaglini has worked extensively on federal lands and within the private sector, most recently for The Nature Conservancy, the National Park Service and the Society for Ecological Restoration. The walk is $15 for Arboretum members, $20 for the general public.

On Wed., April 24, join Lee D’Zmura for Nature Journaling with Spring Ephemerals. Following a brief discussion about these early flowers and techniques to capture their beauty, the class will sketch outdoors and return to the Gallery to compose journal entries. An accomplished artist, D’Zmura earned her certificate in botanical art at Brookside Gardens School of Botanical Art and Illustration and now teaches classes in advanced watercolor at Brookside, in addition to leading art programs across the region. The program runs from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.; registration is $35 for members, $45 for the general public.

In Fleeting Ephemerals, a popular Soup ’n Walk program on Sat., April 27, search for these transitory treasures on a walk led by a docent naturalist. Join a one-hour or two-hour walk to look for spring beauty, Mayapple, dogwood, and many other blooms. Following the walk, enjoy a hearty and delicious lunch followed by a brief talk about the meal’s nutritional value. Copies of recipes are provided. The two-hour walk begins at 10 a.m.; the one-hour walk begins at 11 a.m. Registration is $20 for members, $25 for the general public.

To register for the Arboretum’s spring ephemerals programs, visit www.adkinsarboretum.org or call 410.634.2847, ext. 0.

In photo: Virginia bluebells (Mertensia virginica) are among the spring ephemerals visitors can view at Adkins Arboretum. In the coming week, the Arboretum will offer three programs focused on these short-lived harbingers of spring. Photo by Ann Rohlfing.

 

Adkins Arboretum Announces Spring Nature Programs for Preschoolers

Adkins Arboretum preschool (400 x 487)Bunnies, flowers, gardens and nests! Join Adkins Arboretum’s spring preschool program, and engage your young child with nature. Led by Arboretum Youth Program Coordinator Jenny Houghton, this popular series of six classes for three- to five-year-olds is offered on Tuesday mornings beginning April 9.

Registration is required for preschool programs. The fee is $50 for members, $65 for the general public for all six classes in the series. A $10 discount is offered for siblings. Classes run from 10 to 11:15 a.m. and include a craft and a healthy snack. Enrollment is limited, so early registration is recommended. For more information or to register, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Programs include:

Bunny Hop—April 9
Spring is here, and so are the rabbits! Have a thumpin’ good time exploring the world of the bouncy cottontail. We’ll dance the Bunny Hop, munch on rabbit snacks, and watch a puppet show featuring Hoppity Rabbit.

Garden Days—April 16
Learn how seeds grow, and lend a helping hand in the Funshine Garden. We’ll plant vegetables and flowers in the garden beds, enjoy a picnic snack, and decorate flower pots to take home

April Showers—April 23
We all know that “April showers bring May flowers,” but what brings April showers? Learn how rain forms, then join in a rainy day symphony! We’ll also conduct rainy bag and cloud bottle experiments.

Lovely Ladyslippers—April 30
Search for ladyslipper flowers in the woods after a lesson on these lovely native orchids. We’ll make a bouquet of paper flowers, twirl around a maypole tree, and share flower cookies.

Which Nest is Best?—May 7
Now that spring is here, many birds are busy building nests for their babies. Take a peek inside the Arboretum’s bluebird houses, hold a nest in your hands, and learn about the different ways birds build their homes. We’ll sample a bird’s nest snack and make a nest craft to take home.

Wetland Magic—May 14
The wetland comes alive in spring! Use nets and buckets to discover some of the creatures that call the wetland home, from wiggly tadpole to shy painted turtle. We’ll also mix up a batch of froggy goo and read delightfully swampy stories.

In photo: Adkins Arboretum Youth Program Coordinator Jenny Houghton leads preschoolers in discovering the texture of a leaf. The Arboretum’s spring preschool programs begin April 9.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. Through its Campaign to Build a Green Legacy, it will build the W. Flaccus and Ruth B. Stifel Center at Adkins Arboretum and a “green” entranceway to broaden educational offerings and research initiatives promoting best practices in conservation and land stewardship. For additional information about Arboretum programs, visit www.adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum, 12610 Eveland Road, P.O. Box 100, Ridgely, MD 21620
410.634.2847
www.adkinsarboretum.org
info@adkinsarboretum.org

Adkins Arboretum Calendar Listings, February – March

FEBRUARY
First Saturday Guided Walk
Saturday, February 2, 10 a.m.
Free for members, free with admission for the general public
Explore the rich and unique native plant habitat of Adkins Arboretum. The plant habitats you’ll see include mature and young native forests, meadows, a wetland, as well as a rain garden and a pollinator garden. You may also visit the Arboretum’s Native Plant Nursery and the children’s teaching garden. Tours begin at the Visitor’s Center and last approximately one hour. 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for more information.

Nature as Muse
Wednesday, February 6, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Free for members, free with admission for the general public
Each month this writing group will follow a different winding path through the Arboretum to quietly observe nature in detail. This will provide inspiration for expressing ideas that begin as seeds in our minds and then blossom into discovery as we write. No previous writing experience necessary. Enjoy how the paths in the Arboretum and the paths in your mind can lead you on an unpredictable but delightful journey. Bring a sack lunch and dress for both indoor and outdoor forest adventure. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for more information.

Beginning Vegetable Gardening
Friday, February 8, 10 a.m. – noon
$15 members, $20 general public
Little is more satisfying than growing your own food. Except eating it! Best for novice gardeners, this class will teach the basics behind raising your own produce. Elizabeth Beggins will discuss what to plant, when to plant it, and where to get it; equipment needs; soil building techniques; and recipes for garden success. Make this the season for your vegetable garden dream to finally come alive. Beggins is a writer and educator with over a decade of experience as a market gardener on the Eastern Shore. She believes that health depends on a keen understanding of what we eat and that our choices as consumers are vital to sustaining ourselves and our planet. She also is director of The You Food Project, a grassroots initiative designed to connect youth to food and the environment through school gardens. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for more information.

Wild Wild Weather
Friday, February 15, noon – 1 p.m.
Free for members, free with admission for the general public
Dan Satterfield, a forecast meteorologist for more than 32 years will speak about climate change and his work with Climate Central. He is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma with a degree in meteorology (atmospheric physics) and has a master’s degree in earth science. In January 2010, he was a guest of the National Science Foundation on a tour of science underway in Antarctica. On January 11, 2010, Dan became one of fewer than 5,000 people to have ever stood at the South Pole. Seven months later, he spent two weeks on top of the Greenland ice sheet, where scientists were recovering an ice core that will provide climate change information reaching back 130,000 years! Forecasting the weather is Dan’s job, but sharing the wonders of the earth sciences with students is his passion. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for more information.

Winter Tree ID: Learn Your Buds and Bark
Sunday, February 24, 1 – 2:30 p.m.
$15 members, $20 general public
Arboretum Science Advisor Mary Travaglini will also guide discovery of clues on the ground and assess the habitats we visit to help sleuth out trees in winter. Come away knowing your trees without their leaves! Registration required. Learn how to identify some common trees of the East Coast by their shape, buds, and bark. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for information.
MARCH

First Saturday Guided Walk
Saturday, March 2, 10 a.m.
Free for members, free with admission for the general public
Explore the rich and unique native plant habitat of Adkins Arboretum. The plant habitats you’ll see include mature and young native forests, meadows, a wetland, as well as a rain garden and a pollinator garden. You may also visit the Arboretum’s Native Plant Nursery and the children’s teaching garden. Tours begin at the Visitor’s Center and last approximately one hour. 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for more information.

Peatlands and Bog-like Habitats on the Delmarva Peninsula
Saturday, March 2, 1– 2:30 p.m.
Fee: $15 members, $20 general public
Bogs are wetlands habitats with deep deposits of peat, or partially decomposed plant material. Because most bogs develop in areas of the world where glaciers formerly occurred, there are no true bogs on the Delmarva Peninsula. There are, however, wetland habitats on the Peninsula where peat is well formed and bog-like conditions develop, including habitats such as Atlantic white cedar swamps, acidic fens, and interdunal swales. These habitats often support carnivorous plants that are adapted to the unique environmental conditions that result from peat formation. Join Bill McAvoy to learn more about the ecology and flora of these fascinating habitats.
McAvoy is the botanist for the Delaware Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program and has studied and published on both the vascular and nonvascular flora of the Delmarva Peninsula for over 20 years. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for information.
Nature as Muse
Wednesday, March 6, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Free for members, free with admission for the general public
Each month this writing group will follow a different winding path through the Arboretum to quietly observe nature in detail. This will provide inspiration for expressing ideas that begin as seeds in our minds and then blossom into discovery as we write. No previous writing experience necessary. Enjoy how the paths in the Arboretum and the paths in your mind can lead you on an unpredictable but delightful journey. Bring a sack lunch and dress for both indoor and outdoor forest adventure. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for more information.

Philadelphia Flower Show bus trip
Wednesday, March 6, 8 a.m. – 6 p.m.
$75 members, $95 general public includes transportation, tip, and admission
Register by Tuesday, February 26.
The British have a word for something that’s inventive, dazzling, and extraordinary. That word is “brilliant!” In 2013, the PHS Philadelphia Flower Show will glow with the majestic beauty and creative genius of Great Britain and will pay tribute to centuries of inspiring and influential culture, culminating in the urbane design of 21st-century London. Your admission ticket provides access to the Show’s finest features, including complimentary wine tastings, horticultural demonstrations, culinary presentations, and shopping in the Marketplace. The bus departs from Creamery Lane parking lot (near the fire station) in Easton at 8 a.m. and from Adkins Arboretum in Ridgely at 8:30 a.m. An additional stop at the 301/291 Park and Ride for Chestertown-area participants will be added upon request. The bus will depart for home at 6 p.m. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for information.

Growing with Kids
Friday, March 8, 10 a.m. – noon
$15 members, $20 general public
Children are innately curious, and few opportunities hold as many exciting possibilities for discovery as spending time in a garden. Adults, whether family or friends, serve as a gateway by creating time and space for the young to explore the abundance of life that can come from the earth. Elizabeth Beggins will provide ideas for kid-friendly gardening projects that are sure to inspire growers of every age. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for information.

Composting
Saturday, March 9, 10 – 11:30 a.m.
$15 members, $20 general public
Join Dr. Francis R. Gouin, Professor Emeritus, University of Maryland and composting expert, to learn about the science in composting, how to start a compost pile and manage it from start to finish, and the benefits of using compost in gardening. Enough Said, a compilation of 125 essays that Dr. Gouin wrote for the Annapolis Horticulture Society newsletter over a twelve-year period, will be available for purchase at this program. This collection of articles on composting, pruning, soil testing, planting, eliminating pesky weeds (like bamboo and kudzu), and much, much more is a user-friendly reference that many gardeners consider an indispensible guide to “best practices” in the garden. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for information.

iNaturalist
Sunday, March 10, 1–2:30 p.m.
Free with admission
Ever taken an interesting photo of a plant or animal, and wanted to share what you’ve seen and where you’ve seen it? Liberate that photo from your hard drive, and share it with an online army of naturalists and scientists. Matt Muir will show how social media, photo sharing, and nature are linking local and global expertise for use in education and science. In an ever-growing world of nature-sharing websites, Matt will focus on iNaturalist.org, a free and open-source community that connects your observations to species range maps, state and county lists, and other external information sources. Learn how iNaturalist can be used to keep lists of all your species records, to establish projects where others can complement your efforts, to seek identification help, and to create field guides for your backyard, your favorite nature area, or any location that you choose. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for information.
Geological Formations and Weather Patterns
Friday, March 15, 1–2 p.m.
Fee: $15 members, $20 general public
Environmental issues such as climate change and sea level rise are both at the forefront of public interest. Archaeology, as a discipline, is generally not viewed as a way to understand these topics, but according to Darrin Lowery, Ph.D., the best way to understand the impact of climate is to look at the past. By integrating both geology and archaeology, we can more thoroughly understand important environmental issues associated with the Chesapeake Bay region. Join Dr. Lowery to explore various aspects supporting a detailed understanding of Delmarva’s ever-changing landscape.
Raised on Tilghman Island, Dr. Lowery comes from a long line of boat builders, farmers, and watermen. His interest in archaeology and geology began at the age of seven while combing the eroding shorelines of the Chesapeake Bay with his father. His interest is in how geological formations reveal weather patterns and how these weather patterns affect human development. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for information.

Herpetology Walk: Amphibians and Reptiles
Saturday, March 16, 10–11:30 a.m.
Free with admission
Join Scott Smith to learn about the frogs, turtles, snakes, and salamanders that inhabit the Arboretum wetlands and forest. Scott Smith is the Maryland DNR-Natural Heritage Program Wildlife Diversity Ecologist and Amphibian and Reptile Atlas project coordinator for Talbot and Caroline counties. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for information.

Landscape Design Workshop
Saturday, March 16, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
Fee: $85 members, $110 general public
This workshop will address the typical challenges of homeowners in the Chesapeake Bay region. Three experienced landscape designers and avid gardeners will lead this all-day intensive design session. Come with your challenges and dreams, and leave with a landscape plan, ideas, and confidence to transform your home landscape for your enjoyment and pride.
Workshop leaders are Arboretum Executive Director Ellie Altman; landscape architect Barbara McClinton, formerly of the Baltimore landscape architecture and land planning firm Daft, McCune, Walker; and landscape designer and native plant enthusiast Chris Pax, a graduate of the George Washington University sustainable landscape design master’s program. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for information.

Introduction to Nature Journaling
Wednesday, March 20, 10 a.m.–2:30 p.m.
Fee: $35 members, $45 general public
This workshop with Lee D’Zmura presents the popular pastime of nature or travel journaling. Participants will learn techniques to quickly and spiritedly record plants, animals, experiences, and places as they happen. Emphasis will be placed on initial sketches, text, and color rendering. Bring a sack lunch; a list of materials will be provided. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for information.

Sticks and Stones: A Garden’s Bones
Friday, March 22, 1–2 p.m.
Fee: $15 members, $20 general public
The first time he saw a rustic fence made of eastern red cedar, Pierre Moitrier immediately fell under the spell. He was compelled to start building with this wonderful material. Along the way, he found a true outlet for his creativity. Drawing inspiration from nature, his travels, and the charm of the old villages in France, he started creating one of-a-kind structures for the garden. In this talk, Pierre will take you from harvest to construction and show you how to transform a mere pile of cedar twigs into benches, fences, arbors, and gazebos that showcase intricate patterns. While presenting beautiful slides of his work, he will share valuable insights on construction techniques. Walk out inspired and ready to build your own rustic cedar structure!

Moitrier is a professional gardener at Designs for Greener Gardens, an Annapolis-based fine gardening company he owns and operates with his wife, Nancy. After leaving his native France twelve years ago with a degree in sustainable rural land use, Pierre landed in the garden universe. He quickly developed a strong interest in gardening and a true passion for the -kind hardscapes for the garden, including rustic stonework, magical garden follies, and creative woodwork using native Juniperus virginiana in its rough form. His work has been featured in Adrian Higgins’ column, on HGTV and in American Nurseryman, among others. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for information.
Full Moon Walk
Wednesday, March 27, 6–8 p.m.
Fee: $15 members, $20 general public
Take a guided tour of the Arboretum under a full moon. We’ll discover the night sights and sounds of the meadow and forest, the crunch of leaves underfoot, and spring in the woodland. Along the way, with guidance from Science Advisor Mary Travaglini, we might identify some buds by flashlight, check what the goats do under a full moon, and even see what smells the plants might give us. At the end of our walk, a little fire will be going, and we will have warm drinks and marshmallows to toast! Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for information.
ART EXHIBITS
Discovering the Native Landscapes of Maryland’s Eastern Shore, Adkins Arboretum’s fourteenth annual art competition, will be on view February 4 through March 29. This show draws entries in many different media by artists from the Mid-Atlantic area and beyond. The juror for this year’s show is Alex Castro, Adjunct Professor of Art at Washington College, who has recently introduced the college’s first classes in environmental art. There will be a reception Saturday, February 16 from 3 to 5 p.m.
One Hundred Footsteps is a unique collaboration between writer Jennifer Wallace and visual artist Katherine Kavanaugh, both of Baltimore. In this limited edition work, fifty of Wallace’s haiku-like poems are paired with fifty small collage drawings by Kavanaugh. Although the poems and images aren’t meant to illustrate one another, they share parallel contemplative moods. On view April 1 through May 31, this meditative exhibit was inspired by a medieval Japanese collaborative poetic form, the renga, often composed of 100 verses. There will be a reception Saturday, April 20 from 3 to 5 p.m.

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Winter and Spring Soup ’n Walks
Nature, Nurture, and Nutrition
Saturdays, February 23, March 23, April 27, 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m.
Fee: $20 members, $25 general public
Registration required. Limit: 25
Track the changing landscape from winter to spring. Following a guided walk with a docent naturalist, enjoy a delicious and nutritious lunch along with a brief lesson about the meal’s nutritional value. Copies of recipes are provided.

February 23—Seeking Snow and Winter Warmth
Seek out green plants that cherish the warm winter sun, and possibly snow-covered plants, on this wintry walk. Plants of interest include mosses, cranefly orchid, magnolia and holly leaves, pine and red cedar needles, Christmas fern, and the green stems of strawberry bush and greenbrier.

Menu (gluten free)
Caldo verde with kale
Roasted winter vegetables with fresh herbs
Quinoa, green bean, and tomato salad
Almond cake with lemon frosting

March 23—Buds and Early Blooms
Many trees and shrubs are sporting new spring buds, fiddleheads are emerging on Christmas fern, and early pink and purple blooms are beginning to appear. Register for a one-hour or two-hour walk to check out skunk cabbage, spring beauty, and bloodroot blooms and the soft buds of paw paw, hickory, and tulip tree.

Menu
Beet and cabbage soup
Black-eyed pea salad
Dill rye bread with strawberry jam
Raspberry rhubarb cobbler

April 27—Fleeting Ephemerals
Appearing in early spring, ephemerals flower, fruit, and die back in a short period of time. Join a one-hour or two-hour walk to catch glimpses of pink spring beauty, Mayapple, and dogwood blossoms, yellow trout lily, golden groundsel, sassafras and spicebush blooms, and white beech tree blossoms.

Menu
Chicken rice vegetable soup
Cabbage and carrot slaw with nuts
Ancient grain bread with buckwheat honey
Baked pineapple
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Nature Preschool Programs begin February 5. This six-week series for 3- to 5-year-olds includes programs on icicles, cardinals, worms, and much more! Preschoolers explore the Arboretum’s forest and meadows and enjoy stories, crafts, and healthy snacks. Programs are held on Tuesdays, February 5 to March 12, from 10 to 11:15 a.m. The fee for the series is $50 for members, $60 for the general public ($10 sibling discount). Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for information.

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Science Wizardry for Home School Students
Thursdays, February 7–March 14, 1–2:30 p.m.
Fee: $55 members, $70 general public ($10 sibling discount)
Program is designed for students in grades 2–5
Students will embrace the exciting world of science through fun, hands-on experiments. Scientific themes explored during this six-week session include sound and light waves, molecules, the color spectrum, buoyancy, and flight. A portion of each class will be spent outside, so students should come dressed for the weather. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for information.

 

Adkins Arboretum Offers Nature Preschool Programs

Adkins Arboretum preschool programs (400 x 288)From woodland walks to meadow adventures, introduce your preschooler to the wonders of the natural world. This winter, Adkins Arboretum will again offer its popular programs for three- to five-year-olds.

Advance registration is required for preschool programs. The fee is $50 for members, $65 for the general public for all six classes in the series. Classes meet on Tuesdays from 10 to 11:15 a.m. and include a craft and a healthy snack. Enrollment is limited, so early registration is recommended. For further information or to register, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, extension 0.

Classes include:

Incredible Icicles
February 5
Brrr—it’s icicle time! Find out how icicles form, and look for icicles on a wintry walk. Children will create a sparkly icicle craft and munch on icicle treats while listening to winter stories.

Cardinal Valentine
February 12
Bring on the red for this cozy cardinal class! After an entertaining (and educational) puppet show featuring Katie the Cardinal, children will look for cardinals on a meadow walk and make valentine treats for the birds.

Warm in the Cold
February 19
When the cold winds blow, where do the animals go? Learn about ways animals keep warm in wintry weather and search the forest for signs of winter critters, then return to the classroom for hot chocolate and animal stories.

Twigs and Bark
February 26
Bare winter branches provide the perfect opportunity to explore twigs and bark. Children will sort twigs by color and feel, make bark rubbings, and create twig art along the Arboretum’s woodland paths.

In Like a Lion
March 5
Welcome the month of March with a lesson on wind! Where does wind come from? How can we “see” the wind? Activities will include a wind experiment, kite flying in the meadow, and windy poems.

Wiggly Worms
March 12
Worms are a gardener’s best friend! Children will head to the Funshine Garden to dig up wiggly wildlife and prepare the beds for spring planting. A “Wiggle and Waggle” song, worm race, and garden craft will round out the morning.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. Through its Campaign to Build a Green Legacy, it will build the W. Flaccus and Ruth B. Stifel Center at Adkins Arboretum and a “green” entranceway to broaden educational offerings and research initiatives promoting best practices in conservation and land stewardship. For additional information about Arboretum programs, visit www.adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

In photo: Adkins Arboretum Youth Program Coordinator Jenny Houghton leads preschoolers on a woodland adventure during one of the Arboretum’s nature preschool programs. The winter preschool series begins Tues., Feb. 5.