Tag Archives: Queen Anne’s County Fair

Queen Anne’s County Fair August 11-16 at the 4-H Park

rodeoQueen Anne’s County Fair August 11-16 at the 4-H Park

Looking for something to do?  Come on out to the 2014 Queen Anne’s County Fair August 11-16 at the 4-H Park!  Located outside of Centreville on Route 18, The Queen Anne’s County Fair offers many events and activities for people of all ages.

There will be a lot of activities going on like a Beef & Dairy Show, Swine Show, Sheep Show, Horse Shows, and many more.  The Livestock Auction for market animals will take place Friday, August 15 at 6pm in the Hog Barn Show Ring.  Monday, August 11 we will kick off the fair with opening ceremonies at 7pm.  Tuesday, August 12 the fair will host events such as a Dressage Demonstration, Pedal Pull and a Crab Cake Dinner by the Queenstown Lions Club.  Wednesday, August 13 we will have a Chicken Barbecue Dinner, Fashion Review, Barnyard Olympics and Cream of the Crop Show.  Thursday, August 14 events include Pretty Animal Contest, Wood Carving, Lawn Garden Tractor Pull, Pork Dinner, and Tri-cycle Races.  Friday, August 15 we will have the Maryland State Sport “Jousting, Olympic Horse Jumping and Barbecue Beef Dinner.  To end the week, Saturday August 17 come out to participate in a Corn Hole Game, and a Truck Pull and a greased pig contest.  We will also have a Rodeo full of talented bull riders and barrel racers!  We will have an exotic petting zoo Tuesday and Wednesday from 4pm-9pm with animals such as a Kangaroo and a Camel.  The Queen Anne’s County Fair will have entertainment by the Chris Sack’s Band, Bay Country Gentlemen, The Jones Boys, 21 Horses, and Karaoke by Eddie Hitt.  Hope to see you there!

For more information on the Horse shows or other Fair activities and schedule, go to www.queenannescofair.com.

The QAC Fair is Coming August 12!

Baby Swine (400 x 268)Looking for something to do? Come on out to the 2013 Queen Anne’s County Fair August 12-17 at the 4-H Park! Located outside of Centreville on Route 18, The Queen Anne’s County Fair offers many events and activities for people of all ages.

There will be a lot of activities going on like a Beef & Dairy Show, Swine Show, Sheep Show, and many more. The Livestock Auction for market animals will take place Friday, August 16 at 6pm in the Hog Barn Show Ring. Monday, August 12 we will kick off the fair with opening ceremonies at 7pm. Tuesday, August 13 the fair will host events such as a Dressage Demonstration, Barnyard Olympics and a Crab Cake Dinner by the Queenstown Lions Club. Wednesday, August 14 we will have a Chicken Barbecue Dinner, Dog Agility Demonstration, Fashion Review, and Cream of the Crop Show. Thursday, August 15 events include Pretty Animal Contest, Lawn Garden Tractor Pull, Pork Dinner, and Tri-cycle Races. Friday, August 16 we will have the Maryland State Sport “Jousting, Olympic Horse Jumping and Barbecue Beef Dinner. To end the week, Saturday August 17 come out to participate in a Corn Hole Game, and a Truck Pull. We will also have a Rodeo full of talented bull riders and barrel racers! We will have an exotic petting zoo Tuesday and Wednesday from 4pm-9pm with animals such as a Kangaroo and a Camel. The Queen Anne’s County Fair will have entertainment by the Chris Sack’s Band, Bay Country Gentlemen, The Jones Boys, Hot Tub Limo, and Karaoke by Eddie Hitt. Hope to see you there!

For more information on the Horse shows or other Fair activities and schedule, go to www.queenannescofair.com.

Fair Weather Friends

By Sandra Zunino

It’s more than the aromas of fried clams, funnel cake and cotton candy; more than Ferris Wheels and amusement rides, the Queen Anne’s County Fair is the culmination of a year’s hard work and a source of well-earned pride for many young exhibitors. Two examples are Caitlin Hodges and Jiselle Zunino.

Both 18 from Stevensville, these Pony Express 4H members were bestowed the  honor of presenting the flags during Opening Ceremonies last Monday. Mounted flag carriers are chosen based on club seniority, officer status and ability of both rider and horse to safely carry the flags.

2010 Pony Express President Caitlin has been in the club for six years. She  joined to expand her equestrian skills and make friends, but mostly because her best friend, Jiselle was already in 4H.  “We were friends since kindergarten, later we started riding together,” says Caitlin.

While Caitlin took riding lessons at various stables over the years, it was when her parents leased Jiselle’s pony, Wildfire, and she subsequently joined 4H that her riding abilities excelled. After attending meetings and riding in shows, Bob and Sue Hodges realized Caitlin’s horse bug wasn’t going away. The following year, they purchased a 4-year-old paint named “Dusty” and became avid 4H volunteers themselves.

Caitlin held the office of historian for two years before being elected this year as president.

Additionally, her 4H contacts lead her to compete for the 2010 Miss QAC Farm Bureau contest. She says the public speaking skills she honed in 4H helped her win the title. “I’m much better at public speaking because of 4H,” says Caitlin. “My leadership, teamwork, work ethic and responsibility have all gotten much better.”

2010 Pony Express Vice President Jiselle joined the club at 8 and has held almost every office available including chaplain, historian, reporter, secretary, and two terms of vice president.  She served as president in 2008.

Trying to get the horses to participate with large flapping flags seemingly chasing them took much training on the part of both girls. Jiselle hung a flag in her horse, Rocky’s, stall to acclimate him to it, and practiced riding with flag in hand for an entire season before carrying the flag in 2008. Caitlin used Pat Parelli training methods to desensitizing her horse to the flag.

The duo also ride in the Pony Express Mounted Drill Team, which performs immediately before the flag presentation. Jiselle says years of riding together on drill were instrumental in choreographing the flag presentation.  “Last year we won Champion Pairs Reining with a routine we put together in 10 minutes,” explains Jiselle, “but the communication evolved over many years of working together.”

The girls will be exhibiting their horses throughout the week, Caitlin showing in Western classes, while Jiselle shows English.  Any achievements are well-earned as 4H exhibitors must do all the work involved with the project animal.  “It’s awful sometimes, getting up early and dealing with the heat,” says Caitlin,  “but when you get that award, it’s so gratifying.”

Both riders say, while it’s an honor to carry the flags, it’s also bittersweet. “All our 4H years, we’ve watched the seniors carry the flags and then move on to college,” explains Jiselle. “It’s like our final farewell.”

Following suite, the friends will both attend Anne Arundel Community College in the fall.

Behind the Scenes at the QAC Fair

By Sandra Zunino
The Queen Anne’s County Fair officially began last Monday. And while the fair will continue until 11:00 Saturday night, ending with the excitement of the rodeo, this one-week extravaganza actually takes an entire year to coordinate.

Planning for each fair, which takes place annually every second week in August, starts in September with a meeting of the QAC Fair Committee.  There is a long list of chairpersons starting with Tom Gannon as Fair Chairman. Fair Co-Chairpersons are  Beverly Cross and Andrew McLean who also acts as Commercial and Vendor Chairman. Teresa Hammer is treasurer and Charlene Rhodes is secretary.  Every contest and show, whether beef, swine, poultry, rabbit, horse or other livestock also has a chair. All in all, about 50 volunteers comprise the committees with some dedicated souls taking on more than one responsibility.

Funding for the fair comes from revenues it generates through admissions and vendor fees.  The QAC Fair also receives a small grant from the Maryland Agricultural Fair Board, which receives its money from the racing commission. However, cutbacks in the racing industry have caused that amount to shrink over the years.

The University of Maryland Extension is responsible for the 4H part of the fair.  University of Maryland Extension volunteers conduct all the 4H activities with oversight provided by Christine Johnston and Sally Rosenberry, the only paid staff members of that branch.

While winter months are dedicated to prep work such as getting the QAC Fair web page in order, May, June and July gradually become more hectic with the handling of entries, coordinating camper spots, ordering ribbons, etc.  The weeks before and during the fair demand long hours. Secretary Charlene arrives at the Operations Center, which is the fair headquarters at 7:30 a.m. and stays until 11:00 p.m.

“And this is my vacation!” she laughs. As it is for many of the volunteers who take off from their paying jobs to work through the duration of the fair.

While some jobs are administrative, others ensure the health and safety of the project animals, exhibitors and even the patrons.  This year a pig might have been lost if careful eyes had not observed it was lacking much-needed water. In another instance, a 4-year-old child, lost on the fairgrounds, was recovered after an announcement was made – and that was just the first day!

Another critical faction is the 4H Park Board.  This 12-member board ensures the welfare of the park all year, but in weeks before the fair, the real work begins with grooming the riding arena, placing bleachers, making minor and major repairs, and getting the grounds in top-notch condition. Since the park is used year round for 4H and many other events, it’s important to constantly maintain and improve the grounds to meet the growing needs of the community.

Park board members serve 3-year terms and are elected by 4H leaders and current board members.  Three new board members are chosen every year to keep the board revolving.

Despite the hard work required to bring the fair together, volunteers come back year after year. When asked why, the majority respond, “for the kids.”

According to Christine Johnston, seeing the youths’ excitement when they show their animal, or observing the growing sense of responsibility that evolves through the 4H experience is priceless.

Queen Anne’s County Fair

County Fair with 4-H shows in dairy, beef, swine, sheep and goats as well as 4-H horse shows. Open class shows in dairy, beef, swine and goats. There will also be exhibits in 4-H indoor and open class home arts and farm crops. Rides, contests, live entertainment. Saturday come watch a Rodeo and Truck Pull. At QAC 4-H Park, Dulin Clarke Rd., Centreville. Hours: Monday (opening day) 4-10 p.m.; August 10-14, 9 a.m.-10 p.m. Admission is $2 Monday through Friday and $3 on Saturday. Queenannescofair.com. 410-758-0267.

MARYLAND CHILD ID Program at the 2010 QAC Fair

Centreville Lodge No. 180 of the Maryland Freemasons will present their MdCHIP child identification program at the 2010 Queen Anne’s County Fair in cooperation with the Queen Anne’s County Office of the Sheriff and the Queen Anne’s County 4H Club.

Sheriff Gary Hofmann, The Queen Anne’s County 4H Club and the Masonic Lodge are very glad to bring this program to the community. “If we can educate, and document a child, to prevent a missing or lost child, or assist in locating a missing child we have done well by being prepared. It’s important to have a preventative plan, to help locate a missing child” added Sheriff Gary Hofmann

Maryland Freemasons schedule and bring the MdCHIP program to communities throughout Maryland free of charge. In just minutes, we provide parents and guardians with a comprehensive child identification kit to take home for safe keeping. If a child becomes missing, the pack can then be provided to law enforcement to aid in recovery and identification. In fact, this system is currently being used by law enforcement in over 40 states. “I am glad that we have this partnership with this and so many other organizations to assist our community “ added Sheriff Gary Hofmann

The MdCHIP child identification kits capture all the vital information required by the Amber Alert system and includes each child’s name, address, height, weight, eye color, hair color, digital fingerprints, description of distinguishing marks, notes on health concerns, birth date, parental/guardian contact information, multiple photos and a video interview of the child with his or her voice. To address privacy and safety concerns, our program assures that each child’s parent or guardian is the only person who retains the information captured. The Maryland Freemasons keep nothing but a permission form.

Every day 2000 children are reported missing. Every year 200,000 children are taken by family members. 58,000 children are victims of non-family abductions. The key to recovering these children is quick action by parents and law enforcement. The MdCHIP program helps parents and guardians stay prepared for such an emergency, and is endorsed by law enforcement associations and departments throughout Maryland and the United States.

In cooperation with the Queen Anne’s County Sheriff’s Office, Queen Anne’s County 4H Club and Centreville Lodge No. 180, A.F. & A.M. will sponsor the MdCHIP program at the 2010 Queen Anne’s County Fair, sponsored by the Grand Lodge of Maryland A.F. & A.M. and by the National Conference of Grand Master’s of North America. This free service will be available Monday through Friday, August 9-13 from 3 pm until 8 pm, and on Saturday, August 14 from 10 am until 8 pm. There is no cost to any child for the kit.

“Countless hours of planning has gone into this process from all of our partners, This will be a great way to help protect our children and assist law enforcement should we ever have a missing child” added Craig McGinnes from the Masonic Lodge

Information about the 4 H Club is:

Queen Anne’s County has twenty 4-H clubs that span the county. We also have a large base of adult volunteers. If you are interested in more information about the 4-H program or volunteering, please call the Extension Office at 410-758-0166.

4-H is a youth program open to all children ages 5 through 18. Our land grant college affiliate is the University of Maryland. Our research and educational information stems from our University as well as other universities across the nation. In addition to our animal projects, we offer projects in all other areas of life skills. We have robotics and GPS navigation, soil and water quality, sewing, baking and photography, to name just a few. Community service is a priority with all of our clubs.

4-H strives to empower youth to reach their full potential, working and learning in partnership with caring adults. The mission of 4-H is to empower youth to reach their full potential, working and learning in partnership with caring adults. Our youth “learn by doing”. Young people learn best when they are involved in their learning. The intent is to do, reflect and apply.