Tag Archives: Wye River Upper School

Two Rivers Bike Ride Attracts More Than Four Hundred Cyclists in Support of Wye River Upper School and The Corsica River Conservancy

DSC_0077 DSC_0215 DSC_0237Two Rivers Bike Ride Attracts More Than Four Hundred Cyclists in Support of Wye River Upper School and The Corsica River Conservancy

On June 28th, 2014 more than 420 cyclists from Maryland, New Jersey, Delaware, Virginia and New York participated in the third annual, Two Rivers Bike Ride in support of Wye River Upper School and the Corsica River Conservancy.  Participants started at the Centreville Courthouse Square and rode in 15, 30, 65 or 100 mile routes.  The ride raised nearly $25,000.

“We are thrilled with the turnout and grateful for the support of the local community and many volunteers and sponsors involved in the event,” said, Myron Richardson, Event Chairman and treasurer of the Board of Trustees of the Wye River Upper School.  “Not only do we attract hundreds of riders, but we also have a huge team of volunteers giving of their time to operate rest stops, support vehicles, help at registration and serve on the event committee.  It’s a phenomenal effort on the part of so many people.”

Honorary Co-Chairs, Brian and Kim Billick made it a family affair.  “We’ve enjoyed participating in this event and believe in the good work of Wye River Upper School (the event’s primary benefactor).  We can’t think of a better way to support our community, while having fun and encouraging others to maintain healthy life-styles,” said Coach Billick.  “This year it happened to coincide with our family reunion.  Everyone participated.  We had a great time and look forward to serving as Honorary Chairs again, “ added Kim Billick.

Event sponsors included, The Town of Centreville, Increte of Maryland and Ruff Roofers among others.

The ride is traditionally held the fourth Saturday of June.  If you are interested in finding out more information or serving on the 2015 Event Committee, please call 410-827-5822.

Wye River Upper School is a college preparatory high school for grades 9-12 offering a supportive, yet challenging curriculum for students with ADHD, ADD, dyslexia and other learning or social differences. For more information visit  www.wyeriverupperschool.org or call 410-827-5822.

Phot0 #1 From Left: Wye River Upper School teacher, Matthew Cowan of Centreville, Brian Billick of Queenstown, WRUS student, Jesse Kirchner of Queenstown and WRUS student, Chris Dorcey of College Park.

Photo #2 TRBR participants fuel up on water and snacks at one of the seven rest stops stationed throughout the bike routes.

Photo #3 TRBR riders roll past Queen Anne’s County farmland.

Former Ravens Head Coach, Brian Billick and Kim Billick to serve as Honorary Co-Chairs of Third Annual Two Rivers Bike Ride

DSC_0081 DSC_0090-2Former Ravens Head Coach, Brian Billick and Kim Billick to serve as Honorary Co-Chairs of Third Annual Two Rivers Bike Ride

After participating as riders in the 100 mile route for the Two Rivers Bike Ride for the past two years, former Ravens Head Coach, Brian Billick and his wife, Kim have stepped up to leadership roles as honorary co-chairs for the third annual event slated for June 28th, 2014.  “We’ve enjoyed participating in this event and believe in the good work of Wye River Upper School (the event’s primary benefactor).  We can’t think of a better way to support our community, while having fun and encouraging others to maintain healthy life-styles,” said Coach Billick.  “This year it will be a family affair.   It happens to coincide with our family reunion.  Everyone will participate.  We can’t wait,” added Kim Billick.

The Billicks are in good company on the leadership team.  Myron Richardson, treasurer for Wye River Upper School and an avid cyclist will serve as event chair and Larry Blount another cycling enthusiast will serve as co-chair.  Additionally, two Wye River students, Meredith Dean and Kasey Lipsey, both sophomores will serve as student co-chairs.  “Last year I rode with my Gramps and a team of friends and family on the 15 mile route. It was a blast, “ said, Dean. 

Meredith’s grandfather, John Kirby has become very active in the school as a result of the bike ride.  He has started collecting donated bikes so that the school will have its own fleet for a cycling class at its new location in the Centerville Armory this fall.

Last year’s ride attracted 300 riders to the start line in Centreville from all over Maryland and parts of New Jersey, DC, Virginia and Delaware.  Riders travel scenic routes along wide-shouldered back roads of Queen Anne’s County with views of the Corsica and Chester Rivers.  The ride raises money to support Wye River Upper School and the Corsica River Conservancy.   The ride has 15, 30, 65 and 100 mile routes with rest stops and safety and support vehicles along the way.  In order to register for the ride visit www.tworiversbikeride.org  or call WRUS office at 410-827-5822.

Photo #1 pictured from left – Co-Chair of TRBR, Larry Blount of Centreville, Kasey Lipsey of Stevensville, Brian Billick of Queenstown, Meredith Dean of Centreville, Kim Billick of Queenstown and Chair of TRBR Myron Richardson of Centreville.

Photo #2 On the stage at the construction site of the future home of Wye River Upper School, the Centreville Armory – from left, Kim Billick of Queenstown, Meredith Dean of Centreville, Kasey Lipsey of Stevensville and Brian Billick of Queenstown. 

Wye River Upper School is a college preparatory high school for grades 9-12 offering a supportive, yet challenging curriculum for students with ADHD, ADD, dyslexia and other learning or social differences. For more information, please contact:  Liz LaCorte, Director of Development at 410-827-5822.

 

Wye River Upper School Students performed the musical Guys and Dolls

#1#2#3Wye River Upper School Students performed the musical Guys and Dolls

On March 13th and 14th, Wye River Upper School (WRUS) students performed the musical, Guys and Dolls, Junior before a full theater of friends and family members. Each Spring, WRUS puts on play for their community in the Cadby Theater of Chesapeake College and this year, Drama Coordinator, Ashley Harold, decided to try a musical. “One of our 11th graders, approached the staff last year and asked if we could do a musical. Our students have wonderful voices so it seemed like a great idea,” explained Harold. 

Throughout the winter, WRUS prepared for the play. Mrs. Harold and other staff worked with the students in the mornings before academic classes. Many options were available for ways in which students could participate which encouraged a large number of students to join the team and use their strengths. Roles included: set builders, customers, back stage crew, light board operators, actors, prop artisans, and advertisers.

Several days before the show, the drama team of students and staff were anxious about the performance. There were many missed practices due to snow days and the lead actor became sick. A few students stepped up to learn new roles in record time, including the lead role. Music Director Kim Nichols explained how impressed she was with the way students pulled together despite challenges “The students blew our socks off with their singing in this first musical performance. Some of the pieces were quite difficult. A couple of students accepted parts at the last hour, and we were even more amazed with their ability to adapt and perform musically.” Mrs. Harold added, “It was a lot of pressure, but the kids pulled it together. They demonstrated excellent team work at the end and helped each other out.”

Next year, WRUS looks forward to performing on their own stage at their new home in Centreville, the National Guard Armory. The historic building which is under renovation holds a large stage, ample seating space and a balcony area for viewers.

Wye River Upper School is a college preparatory high school for grades 9-12 offering a supportive, yet challenging curriculum for students with ADHD, ADD, dyslexia and other learning or social differences. For more information, please contact: Katie Theeke, Director of Admissions and Communications, katietheeke@wyeriverupperschool.org, Tel: 410-827-5822.

Photo #1 WRUS drama students perform Guys and Dolls musical number- Sit Down Your Rocking the Boat.

Photo #2 WRUS students (left to right) Annika Koehler of Centreville, Hadar Pohl of Annapolis, and Jordan Edwards of Centreville perform musical number Bushel and Peck.

Photo #3 WRUS students (left to right) Kyle Hetzel of Pasedena, John Engel of Salisbury, and Julian Reid of Crofton perform act one of the show.

Wye River Upper School student requests Maryland legislators for $1 million in Capital funding

WRUS-Group-with-Hughs Meredith-Gov-HughesWye River Upper School student requests Maryland legislators for $1 million in Capital funding

With former Governor Harry Hughes at her side and in less than one minute, Wye River Upper School tenth grade student Meredith Dean requested a body of seasoned legislators from across the state of Maryland to grant her school $1 million dollars in capital funds. 

On March 10, Dean testified before the Maryland House Capital Budget Sub Committee which included Chair Adrienne Jones of Baltimore County and local Delegate Adelaide Eckhardt of Dorchester County. Meredith shared her story and asked for their support of the renovation of the Centreville Armory as the school site. Her remarks drew an unusual and spontaneous round of applause from the committee.  “I came to Wye River half way through my freshman year and am now a sophomore.  I had been struggling with some subjects like reading and spelling.  I have to say I have come a long way.  I believe that the school moving to the armory is a win-win for everyone.  Well, for us we get a new school and for the town we are preserving a piece of history,”  stated, Dean.

Wye River Upper School is an independent high school serving bright students from Central Maryland and the Eastern Shore with learning differences including ADHD, dyslexia and Asperger’s as well as those who benefit from small class size and responsive teaching strategies.

Accredited by the Association of Independent Maryland Schools and licensed by the State of Maryland, the college preparatory school is close to reaching its capital campaign target, enabling them to complete the full historic restoration of their new home – the Maryland National Guard Armory in Centreville, Maryland.

Governor Martin O’Malley included the renovation project in his 2015 capital budget, which was approved last week by the legislature.  “We are grateful to the Governor and to our local representatives, and legislators from across the State of Maryland for their tangible support, and appreciation of the mission of Wye River Upper School and our campaign to restore and repurpose the Centreville Armory,” stated Tom Seip capital campaign co-chair for the school.

The entire student body and full staff traveled to Annapolis on the day of Meredith’s testimony, where they met with other legislators and provided a presence during the sub-committee hearings.

“Student testimony has been a learning tool for our kids and a meaningful way to gain the current Governor’s support and to assure that the budget item makes its way through the legislative process,” reports Chrissy Aull, Executive Director at Wye River and a special educator who co-founded the school in 2002.  “We are fortunate that Governor Hughes, a Caroline County neighbor, believes in our work and was willing to support our efforts.”

Additionally, students met with eastern and western shore legislators.  James Honeywell, a junior from Chestertown, provided testimony before the Eastern Shore delegation during their weekly meeting.  Congressman Andy Harris was in the room and heard Honeywell’s remarks regarding his success at the school.

“Including our students in these experiences is a hallmark of the school.  We seize the numerous opportunities in their daily lives, as after all, that is what we are preparing our students to be – citizens of their communities. The learning could not be any more powerful or enduring.  Students have a voice, the legislators appreciate their presence, and the civics lesson is much more engaging than a chapter in a textbook,”  noted, Aull.

The school, currently located in leased space on the campus of Chesapeake College, will open its new doors to students this September.  A ribbon cutting ceremony is set for Friday September 5, 2014, to which the public is welcome.  For more information regarding the renovation or admissions, contact Katie Theeke, Director of Admissions or Liz LaCorte, Director of Development at 410-827-5822.

Photos: The House Chamber, Former Governor Harry Hughes sits in the center of the WRUS student body.

Former Governor Harry Hughes listens as Wye River Upper School student, Meredith Dean of Centreville, speaks to the Maryland House Capital Budget Sub Committee.

Wye River Upper School Students Provide Clean Water to Dominican Families

DR-DSC_7368Wye River Upper School Students Provide Clean Water to Dominican Families

On February 16, a group of Wye River Upper School (WRUS) students, parents and staff members returned from a week long service trip in Jarabacoa, Dominican Republic. The group was comprised of thirteen students, six parents and two WRUS staff leaders. WRUS is a college prep high school serving bright students with learning differences such as ADHD, ADD, dyslexia and other learning or social differences. This was the first experience overseas for most of these students.

WRUS Spanish Teacher, Kimberleigh Nichols, organized the trip and this was the second time within two years she led a WRUS team to the DR. Prior to her employment at WRUS, Ms. Nichols had worked at the Doulos Discovery School in Jarabacoa, DR.  Because of Nichols’ connections to the Doulos School, they readily agreed to host the WRUS crew during the 2014 and 2012 trips.

The WRUS staff collaborated with the Doulos staff to organize a variety of activities focused on experiencing the DR culture, exploring the surrounding landscape and completing service projects.

The centerpiece service project involved working with a non-profit company called Filter Pure. Filter Pure creates and distributes ceramic water filters while ensuring the community is educated on the proper usage and long-term benefits. Ceramic water filters are a safe, affordable and sustainable method of obtaining clean water. WRUS students learned about the critical economic impact, as well as health impact clean water has on third world families and communities. Students were shown in a hands-on format how the filters are made. Then they were able to hand deliver the filters to needy families rural communities near Jarabacoa. Delivering the filters was even more meaningful because prior to their trip, students had conducted fund-raisers to pay for most of filters they were delivering. “We saw their faces light up when we gave residents the filters. They were so thankful. They wouldn’t let us leave without sharing something to eat with us” recounted Mr. Martinez, WRUS Art and Technology teacher and co-leader for the trip.

Back in Maryland, the WRUS community of family, friends and staff followed the trip on Twitter and Facebook as the DR team made daily posts. “Why is clean water not a human right?” questioned Nichols in one Twitter message accompanied by a photo of students carrying water filters down a dirt road to an elderly couple’s home.

The WRUS team also experienced DR hospitality while having had dinner in local homes. “Families with very little were so willing to share what they had with us. I felt very grateful” explained ninth grader, Davienne Grogan. Another memorable experience for students included a hike to the top of Spirit Mountain, Ecological Reserve, where they toured a sustainable organic coffee plantation.

The collaboration between WRUS and the Doulos was fitting as both schools share a similar philosophy. The Doulos Discovery School practices expeditionary learning. On their website Dan LeMoine, explains “We (not just students) need to take learning into our own hands … to try, fail, and try again, and learn intangibles like teamwork, overcoming adversity, pushing oneself physically, and simply doing hard things.” http://doulosdiscovery.org/. This message is similar to that of the WRUS program, which emphasizes student learning through experiences. “To learn by doing is how the learning sinks in. Our students, like most other kids, thrive when they can put themselves both physically, mentally, and emotionally into what they are passionate about” states Nichols. WRUS eleventh grader John Engel summed up his experience in the D.R. by stating, “This was the single most life-changing experience I have ever had.”

 

Liz LaCorte Joins Wye River Upper School Staff

LizLaCorte (343 x 400)Wye River Upper School (WRUS) is pleased to announce that Liz LaCorte will join the staff as Director of Development. A graduate of SUNY in Buffalo, New York, Liz brings twelve years of experience in non-profit development to the school’s work to educate bright high school students with learning differences.

“Her experience as both a fundraiser and funder, through her work with community foundations, will bring a wealth of appreciation for that which motivates donors and friends of the school. Liz is smart, motivated and passionate about the causes for which she chooses to work.” says Chrissy Aull, Executive Director for WRUS.

WRUS Capital Campaign Co-Chair Tom Seip adds that her presence will be important as the school seeks to finish an ongoing and successful campaign to raise $5 million dollars to renovate the Armory in Centreville as the future home of the school.

“I look forward to getting to know the many people who care about WRUS and the students they serve. There are some incredible stories of turnaround for their students and I am eager to help strengthen their success.” remarks LaCorte.

WRUS is a non-profit independent day school serving the strengths and needs of bright high school students with learning differences and those who may benefit from small class size and individualized teaching strategies. For more information contact Katie Theeke, Director of Admissions at 410-827-5822.

WRUS Gains Support For Senate Bill 33 To Renovate Armory

christmasarmory (400 x 266)Wye River Upper School has announced that State Senator E.J. Pipkin will sponsor Senate Bill 33 to support the funding for the renovation of the Centreville Armory as the permanent home of Wye River Upper School (WRUS).

Wye River Upper School is an independent high school serving the strengths and needs of bright students with learning differences. Many students enroll at WRUS on the verge of failure in their local schools because their learning differences were not well supported. Nearly half of the WRUS students hail from counties west of the bay.

WRUS grandparent Donna McCready is happy to voice her support for the school and this bill. Commuting daily for a year from their family’s Calvert County home, Donna now rents a condo in Kent County to make the daily trip less time consuming. They return home on weekends. Her granddaughter will graduate this year and continue her education in college. “Our family has made some very significant sacrifices to place her here, but it has been worth every bit, as she is back to her true self again, as a student and a person,” says McCready.

Terri Carta, President of the school’s parent association and a resident of Davidsonville in Anne Arundel County, expresses her enthusiastic support for the bill. “I don’t know where we would be without this school. My son was simply not happy or successful in our local school. We searched high and low for the right school and found WRUS. Coming across the Bridge every day is well worth the effort, as he is so much happier and more productive at WRUS.”

WRUS Executive Director Chrissy Aull recently announced news of the bill to the school’s Trustees, staff, students, families and friends, in a letter seeking their support.

With an initial leadership level gift, the school purchased the Armory in late 2010 and launched a campaign to raise $5 million dollars to renovate the 1926 structure. Having moved through the design phase, the building stands “shovel ready” except for the final push for needed funding.

To date, the “Building Great Minds. Saving Great Spaces.” campaign has garnered $3 million in gifts and pledges. Senate Bill 33, also known as a bond bill, seeks $500,000. in capital funds.

Maryland sets aside a predetermined amount of funding for non-government owned capital projects each year. The capital funds are separate from the state annual operating budget.

“We are grateful for Senator Pipkin’s interest and leadership on this matter, as well as the continued support we’ve received from his staff,” said Aull. “Because WRUS has such a broad geographic reach, our students hail from ten legislative districts, including those in Anne Arundel, Prince George’s, Calvert and Montgomery Counties, we believe other sponsors will be signing on.”

“With the involvement of our students and families, we expect to inform those legislators of the need for WRUS and the funds to assure this renovation,” reports John Devlin, WRUS Board Chair.

 

Armory Renovation Presented As Eco-Friendly Model

A common goal to conserve land and strengthen communities brought representatives of the Queen Anne’s Conservation Association, Eastern Shore Land Conservancy and Wye River Upper School together at the site of the school’s future home in Centreville, MD. Executive Director Jay Falstad of the QACA and Amy Owsley, Deputy Director of ESLC were joined by Trustees and volunteers of all three non-profits as they toured the Maryland National Guard Armory, which is now owned by the school.

WRUS Executive Director Chrissy Aull and WRUS Trustee and Centreville resident Myron Richardson greeted the group, along with WRUS junior Alex Strauel of Easton and sophomore Jesse Kirchner of Queenstown.

Currently located on the campus of Chesapeake College, WRUS began a search for a permanent location five years ago. “We looked at a wide range of options for relocating the school, including corn fields. Our choice to purchase and rehab this building in 2010 was very thoughtful as we recognized the opportunity to repurpose rather than build from scratch on raw land. We very much look forward to being a vital part of the Centreville community and it’s many opportunities for our students. This project serves as the ultimate in teachable moments for our students, whom we encourage to be environmental stewards,” advises Aull.

“We are all members of a larger community, one which depends upon and prides itself on the good work of its citizens to make this county a great place to live. The renovation of the Armory and more importantly, the permanent presence of Wye River Upper School in Queen Anne’s County will be a tangible asset to all of us. The renovation serves as an outstanding model for conservation and community development . We are pleased to lend our skills and experience to support their success,” notes Falstad.

Amy Owsley was particularly impressed with the student involvement as part of a larger community outreach. “When faced with the choice of building new in a far-off cornfield, WRUS has taken a leadership choice in joining and bettering an existing community. ESLC looks forward to partnership opportunities that help Centreville grow its vibrancy, and its trail and open spaces.”

The Armory will be repurposed as Wye River Upper School and will support up to 75 students. With an existing gym, stage and converted classrooms, the building offers everything the school will need except for ball fields. “We hope we can utilize the Parks and Rec fields nearby as we run soccer practice in the morning when those fields are available. It’s another smart way to use existing resources rather than create new facilities,” says Aull.

With adequate funds to progress through the entire design phase, Joann Baker of Torchio Architects has collaborated with Peter Winebrenner of Hord, Coplan, Macht in Baltimore to assure the 1926 structure will be renovated in a historically accurate fashion. With the exception of the add on of an elevator, the building will retain it’s original design and aesthetic. The interior renovation will include the existing second story balcony and the original reconditioned steel cased windows. The National Daughters of the American Revolution is a donor to the project.

Wye River Upper School is an independent day school educating bright high school students with learning differences, and those that benefit from small class size and creative instruction. The school has raised $2.8 million of a $5 million dollar campaign to renovate the building. For more information regarding the school, contact Chrissy Aull at 410-827-5822.

In photo above: Staff, students and volunteers for Wye River Upper School, Eastern Shore Land Conservancy and Queen Anne’s Conservation Association gathered at the Centreville Armory and future home of the school. From top left, Myron Richardson, Jay Falstad, Stoney Duffey, Alan Griffith, Amy Owsley, Alex Strauel, Jij Duffey, Jesse Kirchner and Mary Campbell.

In photo at left: WRUS students Alex Strauel and Jesse Kirchner explain plans to renovate the gymnasium where they will play basketball to Amy Owsley, Deputy Director of ESLC

 

Wye River Upper School Runs a Bus to Easton and Cambridge

Wye River Upper School is pleased to announce that a new bus route has been added to benefit WRUS students living on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. The WRUS bus will pick up students at 7:10am in Cambridge and 7:30am in Easton and then transport students to the WRUS campus located at Chesapeake College in Wye Mills, MD. The afternoon route will depart from WRUS at 4:10pm arriving in Easton at approximately 4:30pm and in Cambridge at 4:50pm. The new route is currently being used by students from Talbot, Dorchester and Wicomico counties. The longstanding WRUS bus that runs to Ann Arundel County will continue to operate as usual.

Wye River Upper School is a college preparatory high school for grades 9-12 offering a supportive, yet challenging curriculum for students with a wide range of learning styles and needs such as ADHD, and dyslexia. For more information, please contact:

Katie Theeke
Director of Admissions and Communications
Tel: 410-384-4588
katietheeke@wyeriverupperschool.org www.wyeriverupperschool.org
…because not all great minds think alike.®

Wye River Upper School Celebrates Ten Years of Educating Area Youth

From: Chrissy Aull

With their future home, the Centreville Armory, beckoning the future, the students, staff, Trustees, families and friends of Wye River Upper School gathered in Donaldson Hall at St. Paul’s Church in Centreville MD to celebrate the school’s past and first major milestone, ten years of service to the youth of the region.

Wye River Upper School is an independent college preparatory school, educating bright high school students with learning differences and those that may benefit from small class size and innovative instruction.

With introductions from WRUS Chair John Devlin, Executive Director Chrissy Aull shared remarks with the guests. Noting the young school has graduated sixty one young adults from nine Maryland counties east and west of the Chesapeake Bay, Aull prefaced “That number is impressive in that many of our students are those who have not met with success in larger, more traditional schools, despite the fact that they are bright, talented, and motivated to succeed. In fact, many come to us on the verge of dropping out. Not only do they graduate, our seniors have been accepted to over twenty different colleges and post secondary programs, ” Aull stated.

The significance of her remarks was not lost on the guests, as spontaneous applause noted.

“While we gather to celebrate the wonderful stories we have generated here these past ten years, it is the future of this young school that now takes priority and deserves our collective focus and support,” remarked Aull, referring to the Armory

Aull introduced special guests beginning with Stuart Bounds, President of the Mid Shore Community Foundation. Bounds recalled the opening of the school in 2002, on the campus of Chesapeake College, where he served as President. “I was admittedly concerned about the daily presence of a younger age group on the campus of college students. It turns out my concerns were unfounded as the students were stellar in conduct and participation within the college culture. The school has been an asset to the college, not simply in a business sense, but in terms of the mission of education that both institutions serve.”

Bounds noted his expectation that Barbara Viniar, current President of Chesapeake College would support that statement.

Richard Sossi attended as a representative of Congressman Andy Harris’ and presented the school with a Certificate of Special Congressional Recognition for the school’s anniversary and continuing dedication to educating the area’s youth.

Guests were invited to tour the 1926 Armory, which the school purchased in late 2010. Using funds from the Building Great Minds. Saving Great Spaces campaign to raise capital, hazardous materials have been removed and all designs for the renovation are complete.

“The Armory stands next door and is “shovel ready,” announced Campaign Co- Chair Tom Seip. “We know that students, staff and the Centreville community is eager to see renovations begin. However, the Board of Trustees is wise in their decision not to consider long term financing as an option to complete the project so we continue our campaign to raise the funds.”

Seip reminded the guests that the work of the larger campaign committee, including Co-Chair Ludwig Eglseder, M.D. had produced impressive results with slightly over half of the five million dollar project having been gifted or pledged. That total includes an $824,000. grant from the Maryland Sustainable Communities Fund, which is payable upon completion of the project.

“We know that the larger community is eager to help us meet this goal and so, plans are underway to take this campaign to a more public level. At the same time we continue to ask the many members of this Eastern Shore community who are able to consider a choice to support our success through gifts to the project.” added Seip.

Centreville Town Council Member Tim McCluskey was one of the evening’s guests. “I can’t think of a project more worthy of our support. Think of all the positives – It’s about educating our youth, repurposing rather than building new footprint and bringing much needed commerce into the community. What more is there?”