Upcoming Events at Talbot County Free Library

St. Michaels Library to Stage Puppet Show
On Tuesday, October 30, at 4:00 p.m., in the St. Michaels branch of the Talbot County Free Library, the library’s own “Miss Carla” will stage her original production of the puppet show “Teeny Tiny Woman.” All library programs are free and open to the public, but patrons are asked to pre-register for this program. For more information, call the library at 410-745-5877, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Stitch and Chat at St. Michaels Library
On Thursday, November 1, at 10:00 a.m., the St. Michaels branch of the Talbot County Free Library will again offer its popular Stitch and Chat program. Patrons are invited to bring their own projects and stitch with a group. All library programs are free and open to the public. Patrons do not need to pre-register for this program. For more information, call the library at 410-745-5877, or visit www.tcfl.org.

Former Smithsonian Curator to Present “Warriors in Uniform”
On Thursday, November 1, at 5:30 p.m., in the Easton branch of the Talbot County Free Library, Dr. Herman J. Viola will present a program about the history of Native Americans in the armed forces of the United States. As Viola has documented in his book “Warriors in Uniform, the Legacy of American Indian Heroism,” Native Americans have worn our country’s uniform in every war since the American Revolution. To this day, a disproportionate number of Native Americans serve in our armed forces. As a Ute friend once told Dr. Viola only partly in jest, “We Indians are grateful that the United States became such a militaristic country because it has provided us with an acceptable way to continue our warrior ways.”

Herman J. Viola, Ph.D., is a curator emeritus at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. A specialist on the history of the American West, he served as director of the Museum’s National Anthropological Archives and organized two major exhibitions for the Smithsonian. “Magnificent Voyagers” told the story of the U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1838-42, while “Seeds of Change” examined the traffic—both intentional and unintentional—in plants, animals, and diseases that occurred between the Old and the New Worlds after 1492. Dr. Viola’s research specialties include the American Indian, the Civil War, and the exploration of the American West.

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